ARTPIL Profiles of the Arts
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Jacquelyn Stuber
photographer

Jacquelyn Stuber is an artist from Albany, California and currently resides and works in Arcata, California. She studied photography at California College of the Arts in Oakland from 2008 to 2012. She is the founder of All Occasions Club, a photographic experiment consisting of analog photography, single editions, and free art. She is a member of the non-profit Breakfast All Day Collective which runs Outer Space, an all ages art center for the community of Arcata.

Jacquelyn uses photography to explore and expose the man-made landscapes of our environment and question the perception of what is natural. Parks, front lawns, reserves, marshes, forests and groves are just as constructed, manipulated and mapped as the buildings that surround them. The wilderness is no longer wild. Her photographs seek a shift in consciousness and collective memory, and encourage thinking in geological time. Through these efforts, the work will prompt conversations that promote awareness and recognition of the destructive history that lies behind seemingly serene settings.

www.jacquelynstuber.com

Jacquelyn Stuber is an artist from Albany, California and currently resides and works in Arcata, California. She studied photography at California College of the Arts in Oakland from 2008 to 2012. She is the founder of All Occasions Club, a photographic experiment consisting of analog photography, single editions, and free art. She is a member of the non-profit Breakfast All Day Collective which runs Outer Space, an all ages art center for the community of Arcata.

Jacquelyn uses photography to explore and expose the man-made landscapes of our environment and question the perception of what is natural. Parks, front lawns, reserves, marshes, forests and groves are just as constructed, manipulated and mapped as the buildings that surround them. The wilderness is no longer wild. Her photographs seek a shift in consciousness and collective memory, and encourage thinking in geological time. Through these efforts, the work will prompt conversations that promote awareness and recognition of the destructive history that lies behind seemingly serene settings.

www.jacquelynstuber.com

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