ARTPIL Profiles of the Arts
Die Welt als Labyrinth
Through May 6, 2018 / MAMCO

MAMCO

Letterism, Letterist International, Second Letterist International, Movement for an Imaginist Bauhaus, Experimental Laboratory of Alba, London Psychogeographical Association, Situationist International, Situationist Times, SPUR.

Taken from Gustav René Hocke’s book about European Mannerism, Die Welt als Labyrinth / The World as a Labyrinth was the title chosen by the Situationists for their project at the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, in 1960. More than an exhibition, it was intended to be a “general manifestation,” transforming the museum rooms into a labyrinth, while a series of dérives was taking place in the city. Guy Debord, who had already written in 1956 a “project for an educational labyrinth,” expressed himself as follows to Constant: “We should intimately mingle atmospheric areas evoking the city, and atmospheric zones evoking the interior of a house. […] I consider this inside-outside mix as being the most advanced point of our experimental construction.”

 

MAMCO

MAMCO / Photo Annik Wetter

The Dutch “manifestation” never saw the light of day, because the SI (Situationist International) refused any form of compromise, as requested by Willem Sandberg, the museum’s director. Such a failure was characteristic of their radical criticism of art as a constituted social field, governed by institutions, and determined by the market economy: from the school to the gallery, taking in UNESCO (which the SI planned to take over) and museums, their struggle was on all the cultural fronts. As of the 1960s, the movement excluded more and more artists before proclaiming, in a “resolution,” that any artwork produced by a Situationist was “anti-Situationist.”

 

MAMCO / Photo Annik Wetter

MAMCO / Photo Annik Wetter

MAMCO / Photo Annik Wetter

By alluding explicitly to this Dutch project, the exhibition at MAMCO immediately shows up the paradox in any museum presentation of these final 20th century avant garde movements: how to show in a museum people who were utterly opposed to cultural institutions?

For this reason, the Geneva version of Die Welt als Labyrinth aims at a journey covering several episodes in this story, rather than the generally dominant genealogical approach to movements with many branches.

 

MAMCO / Photo Annik Wetter

MAMCO / Photo Annik Wetter

MAMCO / Photo Annik Wetter

Even in its title, the exhibition is highlighting the motif of the labyrinth that ran through the period’s productions: as both a preconditioned circuit and a site for encounters, the labyrinth can be seen as one of the best metaphors of the dérive, that “psycho-geographical” experience of the urban territory, which is one of the practices most often associated with the Situationists.

Finally, in this universe, MAMCO wanted in particular to dwell on a few figures who did not want to give up on art: the artistic production of Giuseppe Pinot-Gallizio, Ralph Rumney, Asger Jorn, Gil Wolman, and Jacqueline de Jong (all expelled from the SI, except for Jorn who left of his own accord), thus find a special place here.

 

MAMCO / Photo Annik Wetter

MAMCO / Photo Annik Wetter

MAMCO / Photo Annik Wetter

The exhibition has been organized by a curatorial committee including John Armleder, Gérard Berreby, Paul Bernard, Lionel Bovier, Alexandra Catana Tucknott, Julien Fronsacq and Mai-Thu Perret, and placed under Paul Bernard’s general curatorship. It has also benefitted from the scholarly advice of Luca Bochicchio, Nina Zimmer, Lucas Haberkorn, Jacopo Galimberti, Liliana Dematteis, Natalie Seroussi, Lionel Spiess, Jacqueline de Jong, Patrick Marcolini, Barbara Wolman, Swana Pilhatsch, Arno Morenz, and Ursula Lehman Brockaus.

 

Die Welt als Labyrinth
Through May 6, 2018 / MAMCO GENEVE
For more information please visit the exhibition page >

Recent Articles
David Claerbout at Kunsthaus Bregenz
Jul 14 - Oct 14, 2018 / Kunsthaus Bregenz
Claerbout’s art follows the fascination with the cycles of nature and the…
Claerbout’s art follows the fascination with the cycles of nature and the ideas of care and time. His…
ARTPIL / Prescription .053
Starting our second year
Last week we celebrated our one year anniversary. This week we hit…
Last week we celebrated our one year anniversary. This week we hit the ground running. Welcome to the…
Body & Bokeh
Opens today July 12, 2018 / Leica Paris
Three talented young photographers have been challenged to make a photographic series…
Three talented young photographers have been challenged to make a photographic series using the Leica SL on the…
There Is No Place Before Arrival / Olaf Nicolai
Jul 13 - Oct 7, 2018 / Kunsthalle Wien
Renowned for inventive work with a diverse array of materials and media,…
Renowned for inventive work with a diverse array of materials and media, Nicolai develops a variety of interdisciplinary…
Surface: Patricia Dauder
Through Sep 9, 2018 / National Gallery in Prague
Conceived in situ, Surface is poetic elaboration of an image as a…
Conceived in situ, Surface is poetic elaboration of an image as a complex architecture, composed of layers of…
Poetic Techniques
Interview with Meng Zhou / Aesthetica
“This has always been an implicit driver of my work…cognizance of the…
“This has always been an implicit driver of my work…cognizance of the discourses of cultural appropriation adds an…
Toward a Concrete Utopia
Architecture in Yugoslavia / Jul 15 - Jan 13, 2019
This survey introduces the work of socialist Yugoslavia’s leading architects to an…
This survey introduces the work of socialist Yugoslavia’s leading architects to an international audience, highlighting a body of…
Out of My Window / Gail Albert Halaban
Jul 7 2018 - Jan 1, 2019 / Eastman Museum
By connecting strangers who live across the street from each other, Albert…
By connecting strangers who live across the street from each other, Albert Halaban’s beautifully rendered, large-scale images encourage…
Die Welt als Labyrinth
Through May 6, 2018 / MAMCO

MAMCO

Letterism, Letterist International, Second Letterist International, Movement for an Imaginist Bauhaus, Experimental Laboratory of Alba, London Psychogeographical Association, Situationist International, Situationist Times, SPUR.

Taken from Gustav René Hocke’s book about European Mannerism, Die Welt als Labyrinth / The World as a Labyrinth was the title chosen by the Situationists for their project at the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, in 1960. More than an exhibition, it was intended to be a “general manifestation,” transforming the museum rooms into a labyrinth, while a series of dérives was taking place in the city. Guy Debord, who had already written in 1956 a “project for an educational labyrinth,” expressed himself as follows to Constant: “We should intimately mingle atmospheric areas evoking the city, and atmospheric zones evoking the interior of a house. […] I consider this inside-outside mix as being the most advanced point of our experimental construction.”

 

MAMCO

MAMCO / Photo Annik Wetter

The Dutch “manifestation” never saw the light of day, because the SI (Situationist International) refused any form of compromise, as requested by Willem Sandberg, the museum’s director. Such a failure was characteristic of their radical criticism of art as a constituted social field, governed by institutions, and determined by the market economy: from the school to the gallery, taking in UNESCO (which the SI planned to take over) and museums, their struggle was on all the cultural fronts. As of the 1960s, the movement excluded more and more artists before proclaiming, in a “resolution,” that any artwork produced by a Situationist was “anti-Situationist.”

 

MAMCO / Photo Annik Wetter

MAMCO / Photo Annik Wetter

MAMCO / Photo Annik Wetter

By alluding explicitly to this Dutch project, the exhibition at MAMCO immediately shows up the paradox in any museum presentation of these final 20th century avant garde movements: how to show in a museum people who were utterly opposed to cultural institutions?

For this reason, the Geneva version of Die Welt als Labyrinth aims at a journey covering several episodes in this story, rather than the generally dominant genealogical approach to movements with many branches.

 

MAMCO / Photo Annik Wetter

MAMCO / Photo Annik Wetter

MAMCO / Photo Annik Wetter

Even in its title, the exhibition is highlighting the motif of the labyrinth that ran through the period’s productions: as both a preconditioned circuit and a site for encounters, the labyrinth can be seen as one of the best metaphors of the dérive, that “psycho-geographical” experience of the urban territory, which is one of the practices most often associated with the Situationists.

Finally, in this universe, MAMCO wanted in particular to dwell on a few figures who did not want to give up on art: the artistic production of Giuseppe Pinot-Gallizio, Ralph Rumney, Asger Jorn, Gil Wolman, and Jacqueline de Jong (all expelled from the SI, except for Jorn who left of his own accord), thus find a special place here.

 

MAMCO / Photo Annik Wetter

MAMCO / Photo Annik Wetter

MAMCO / Photo Annik Wetter

The exhibition has been organized by a curatorial committee including John Armleder, Gérard Berreby, Paul Bernard, Lionel Bovier, Alexandra Catana Tucknott, Julien Fronsacq and Mai-Thu Perret, and placed under Paul Bernard’s general curatorship. It has also benefitted from the scholarly advice of Luca Bochicchio, Nina Zimmer, Lucas Haberkorn, Jacopo Galimberti, Liliana Dematteis, Natalie Seroussi, Lionel Spiess, Jacqueline de Jong, Patrick Marcolini, Barbara Wolman, Swana Pilhatsch, Arno Morenz, and Ursula Lehman Brockaus.

 

Die Welt als Labyrinth
Through May 6, 2018 / MAMCO GENEVE
For more information please visit the exhibition page >