ARTPIL Profiles of the Arts
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
MLK & the Civil Rights Movement

Marion S. Trikosko

Today is the birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968). The official namesake national holiday in the U.S., which falls on the 3rd Monday of January and not always on his birthday, has itself had a history of struggle in first becoming law in 1983, with general observances in all 50 states only starting in the year 2000.

Through some strange social contract, the civil inequities have only been transformed into legal institutionalized violence which continues to this day and the very notion of equality as an ideal is under attack by certain extreme right wing groups, some of whose known associates even serve and continue to advise at the White House.

The recent movement of Black Lives Matter was all but successfully quelled by those overly self-righteous, feeling somehow no longer ultra-privileged, refusing to look beyond their limited personal culture or contrived grievances defended by obtuse reasoning.

Only last week the President of the United States referred to some of the black majority nations as something loosely translating as “container for feces,” only more eloquent, voicing his preference towards immigration from more nordic or white majority countries, such as Norway. Norwegians, of course, in turn, quickly responded in solidarity with the targeted countries distancing themselves from such grand ignorance. Speaking of, it’s worth noting that it was Norway and the Swedish Academy who awarded Martin Luther King Jr. the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1964, a year prior to the U.S. Voting Rights Act of 1965. Perhaps America does need more immigration from the Scandinavian countries, if only to come as a committee to educate the White House on these matters.

The selective memory of a nation still needs jogging in order for the dream to come true. Today’s feature honors Martin Luther King Jr. and the Civil Rights Movement. Photography by Bruce Davidson, Yoichi Okamoto, Gordon Parks, James Karales, Marion S. Trikosko, and Bob Adelman.

 

James Karales

Bob Adelman

Bob Adelman

Bruce Davidson

Bruce Davidson

Bruce Davidson

Bruce Davidson

Gordon Parks

Gordon Parks

Gordon Parks

Gordon Parks

Yoichi Okamoto

James Karales

James Karales

“Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity.

But one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languished in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land…

And so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.

I have a dream…”

– Martin Luther King Jr. / 1963

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Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
MLK & the Civil Rights Movement

Marion S. Trikosko

Today is the birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968). The official namesake national holiday in the U.S., which falls on the 3rd Monday of January and not always on his birthday, has itself had a history of struggle in first becoming law in 1983, with general observances in all 50 states only starting in the year 2000.

Through some strange social contract, the civil inequities have only been transformed into legal institutionalized violence which continues to this day and the very notion of equality as an ideal is under attack by certain extreme right wing groups, some of whose known associates even serve and continue to advise at the White House.

The recent movement of Black Lives Matter was all but successfully quelled by those overly self-righteous, feeling somehow no longer ultra-privileged, refusing to look beyond their limited personal culture or contrived grievances defended by obtuse reasoning.

Only last week the President of the United States referred to some of the black majority nations as something loosely translating as “container for feces,” only more eloquent, voicing his preference towards immigration from more nordic or white majority countries, such as Norway. Norwegians, of course, in turn, quickly responded in solidarity with the targeted countries distancing themselves from such grand ignorance. Speaking of, it’s worth noting that it was Norway and the Swedish Academy who awarded Martin Luther King Jr. the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1964, a year prior to the U.S. Voting Rights Act of 1965. Perhaps America does need more immigration from the Scandinavian countries, if only to come as a committee to educate the White House on these matters.

The selective memory of a nation still needs jogging in order for the dream to come true. Today’s feature honors Martin Luther King Jr. and the Civil Rights Movement. Photography by Bruce Davidson, Yoichi Okamoto, Gordon Parks, James Karales, Marion S. Trikosko, and Bob Adelman.

 

James Karales

Bob Adelman

Bob Adelman

Bruce Davidson

Bruce Davidson

Bruce Davidson

Bruce Davidson

Gordon Parks

Gordon Parks

Gordon Parks

Gordon Parks

Yoichi Okamoto

James Karales

James Karales

“Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity.

But one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languished in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land…

And so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.

I have a dream…”

– Martin Luther King Jr. / 1963