ARTPIL Profiles of the Arts
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /

Pauline Araujo
photographer

Born in Roubaix, I grew up in the northern region riddled with the stigma of industrial decline, mired in its different social strata.

Arrived in Lyon in 2010 with a camera, an object still unknown, I found this environment heavy and cut off from humanity, through industry abandoned by a trend, the religion that ages while remaining, the urbanism that immobilize man.

Between the distorted perceptions of everyday urban life and its countryside, a collective unconscious has been formed, haunted by the idea of ​​death. Paradoxes and subtleties of this exacerbated reality often escape our attention. The cliché no longer shows a surface, but an inner reality where a few ounces of life still pulsate. Through decrepit architecture, intensive urban planning, abandoned places, delivered to the onslaught of nature that captures them with a fascinating disdain, we are marked by these raw forms, the clinical spirit, the air of torpor that emanates of everything. It may be a reflection of our own society, resigned, who would have delighted in its fears.

Traveling from Brussels to Lyon in search of industrial, hospitable, and religious specters, my shots are coupled with a reflection on death, embodied by this old Thanatos and his irresistible encumbrance.

I am currently working on a booklet collecting photos and texts around this theme. This publication reports on a research on the deconstruction of the feeling of death, through the motive and the perspective, under the prism of a physical and philosophical reflection.

Around this photographic universe, linked to writing, focused on this search for “active concentrates” of life / death, I also work around the image to emphasize its realness. I retrieve its lines, its tone, and work the framing of photographs. This recovery and rehabilitation of death in the present, close the ring, literally as well as figuratively, this work on the reconciliation of the human with its future past.

Pauline Araujo
photographer

Born in Roubaix, I grew up in the northern region riddled with the stigma of industrial decline, mired in its different social strata.

Arrived in Lyon in 2010 with a camera, an object still unknown, I found this environment heavy and cut off from humanity, through industry abandoned by a trend, the religion that ages while remaining, the urbanism that immobilize man.

Between the distorted perceptions of everyday urban life and its countryside, a collective unconscious has been formed, haunted by the idea of ​​death. Paradoxes and subtleties of this exacerbated reality often escape our attention. The cliché no longer shows a surface, but an inner reality where a few ounces of life still pulsate. Through decrepit architecture, intensive urban planning, abandoned places, delivered to the onslaught of nature that captures them with a fascinating disdain, we are marked by these raw forms, the clinical spirit, the air of torpor that emanates of everything. It may be a reflection of our own society, resigned, who would have delighted in its fears.

Traveling from Brussels to Lyon in search of industrial, hospitable, and religious specters, my shots are coupled with a reflection on death, embodied by this old Thanatos and his irresistible encumbrance.

I am currently working on a booklet collecting photos and texts around this theme. This publication reports on a research on the deconstruction of the feeling of death, through the motive and the perspective, under the prism of a physical and philosophical reflection.

Around this photographic universe, linked to writing, focused on this search for “active concentrates” of life / death, I also work around the image to emphasize its realness. I retrieve its lines, its tone, and work the framing of photographs. This recovery and rehabilitation of death in the present, close the ring, literally as well as figuratively, this work on the reconciliation of the human with its future past.

  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /
  • /