Alexander Calder
Artist

The American artist Alexander Calder was born in Philadelphia in 1898. He studied engineering from 1915 to 1919 at the Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey. He took drawing courses with Clinton Balmer in New York in 1922, and studied at the Art Students League from 1923-25.

In 1926, Calder moved to Paris where he studied at the Académie de la Grande Chaumière. This was where he first made small figures of wire, wood and cloth.

In 1930 Alexander Calder joined the artists group Abstraction Création. He increasingly dealt with abstractions. A visit to the Paris observatory was a major inspiration for his first mobile and abstract wire sculptures, for which Marcel Duchamp came up with the term mobile.

Alexander Calder presented these mobiles at the Galerie Vignon in Paris in 1932 for the first time. In these mobiles Calder had found his very own and most appropriate form of art. The perfectly balanced constructions, moved by a touch of air, were made of metal elements, wires, threads and sticks, they became more complex and abstract over the years, while their impression remained one of great poetry and playful airiness. As counterparts to the mobiles, Calder also made immobile, tectonically heavy, partly monumental constructions of sheet metal, for which Jean Arp invented the term Stabile.

Alexander Calder died in New York in 1976.

[Art Directory]

Alexander Calder
Artist

The American artist Alexander Calder was born in Philadelphia in 1898. He studied engineering from 1915 to 1919 at the Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey. He took drawing courses with Clinton Balmer in New York in 1922, and studied at the Art Students League from 1923-25.

In 1926, Calder moved to Paris where he studied at the Académie de la Grande Chaumière. This was where he first made small figures of wire, wood and cloth.

In 1930 Alexander Calder joined the artists group Abstraction Création. He increasingly dealt with abstractions. A visit to the Paris observatory was a major inspiration for his first mobile and abstract wire sculptures, for which Marcel Duchamp came up with the term mobile.

Alexander Calder presented these mobiles at the Galerie Vignon in Paris in 1932 for the first time. In these mobiles Calder had found his very own and most appropriate form of art. The perfectly balanced constructions, moved by a touch of air, were made of metal elements, wires, threads and sticks, they became more complex and abstract over the years, while their impression remained one of great poetry and playful airiness. As counterparts to the mobiles, Calder also made immobile, tectonically heavy, partly monumental constructions of sheet metal, for which Jean Arp invented the term Stabile.

Alexander Calder died in New York in 1976.

[Art Directory]

  • Georg Kussmann: FRG
    Publication
    MACK
    International
    The German dramatist Heiner Müller observed that German history lies as if smothered by a rheumatism blanket: beneath there is warmth and stagnation, just enough to give the impression all is well, while the peripheries are freezing. Georg Kussmann’s photographs in FRG were created under this metaphoric blanket. Made in the Federal Republic of Germany over a single summer, they depict everyday scenes of life, work, and leisure (more…)
  • Maggie Lee: Magazine
    Feb 10 – May 20, 2024
    Kunsthalle Zürich
    Zürich, Switzerland
    The exhibition Magazine was born out of the artist’s long-held desire to publish her own magazine – a very personal magazine that would nonetheless circulate further than just her own circle of friends. Maggie Lee’s passion for this medium of distribution was inspired by her work in copy stores, and above all by creating zines since her teenage years in New Jersey. There is a special appeal to the creative self-realisation in self-publishing (more…)