Photo Dawin Meckel
Alexandra Baumgartner
Artist

Alexandra Baumgartner’s works are mostly based on found photographs as well as furniture and everyday objects.

Through minimal interventions, juxtapositions and spatial arrangements, she places her mostly anonymous source material in new contexts. Her work extends across different media (collage, installation, painting and object art) and to downright conceptual approaches.

Historical portraits are regularly the subject of her interventions. Images get materially cut or sewn, painted over, and sometimes a new layer of “behind” is opened by burning parts of the image. It is often subliminal tones that Baumgartner is looking for: premonitions, absurd and disturbing moments, a disquieting atmosphere.

The material is examined autopsy-like. Baumgartner’s interest is not in the original context of the source material, but rather in finding a new content, a view of hidden abysses. It is an analysis and elaboration of the fragile relationships between deeply personal feelings and external constraints, between nature, which determines man, who again tries to control them, but remains basically nevertheless inferior.

Alexandra Baumgartner
Artist

Alexandra Baumgartner’s works are mostly based on found photographs as well as furniture and everyday objects.

Through minimal interventions, juxtapositions and spatial arrangements, she places her mostly anonymous source material in new contexts. Her work extends across different media (collage, installation, painting and object art) and to downright conceptual approaches.

Historical portraits are regularly the subject of her interventions. Images get materially cut or sewn, painted over, and sometimes a new layer of “behind” is opened by burning parts of the image. It is often subliminal tones that Baumgartner is looking for: premonitions, absurd and disturbing moments, a disquieting atmosphere.

The material is examined autopsy-like. Baumgartner’s interest is not in the original context of the source material, but rather in finding a new content, a view of hidden abysses. It is an analysis and elaboration of the fragile relationships between deeply personal feelings and external constraints, between nature, which determines man, who again tries to control them, but remains basically nevertheless inferior.

  • Mophradat Open Call / Orbitals
    Deadline Jun 15, 2024
    Mophradat
    International
    Orbitals is a program that takes four curators and arts researchers to an international location to learn about a different artistic context in the Global South and share this knowledge with their communities. During the eight-day guided research trip, the participants, along with members of Mophradat’s team, meet and share experiences with peers from the art scenes they are visiting. (more…)
  • ICON – O – STASYS
    May 31 – Nov 3, 2024
    Stasys Museum
    Panevėžys, Lithuania
    On this day… Stasys arrives back at his home village, Lepšiai… It all happens in May 2024… That’s when the Stasys Museum opens up to the public, a museum titled after him. This was never predicted – the future from there, a little village, in the house within a disorderly wooden structure, run down with dripping roofs, filled with bellowing, roaring farm animals… No fairy tales could be heard there… But just one hour’s walk away from Lepšiai, the white rectangular building stands proudly in the city centre (more…)
  • Fumi Nagasaka: Dora, Yerkwood, Walker County, Alabama
    Publication
    Gost
    International
    During the 2016 US Presidential elections Japanese photographer, Fumi Nagasaka, became intrigued by the rural and southern USA. She had lived in New York City for a decade but despite travelling the world, had yet to visit the rest of the US. All this changed when her friend, Tanya Rouse, invited her to her hometown of Dora, Alabama. Nagasaka continued to visit Dora over several years, gradually building a photographic archive of her visits. (more…)
  • Grey Crawford. Chroma, 1978–85, Vol 1
    Publication
    Beam Editions
    International
    In 1978 Grey Crawford created a body of colour photographic work that was so radical in its aesthetic and technique that few people to this day understand how it was made. Chroma documents late 70s Los Angeles in a period of radical urban transformation. Scenes of vernacular architecture, demolition sites and everyday places are contrasted with graphic forms that float on the surface and sit within the image. (more…)