Photo Grant Delin
Amie Siegel
Artist / Multidisciplinary

Amie Siegel works variously between film, photography, performance and installation. Siegel was born in 1974 and grew up in Chicago. She earned a BA from Bard College in 1996 and an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1999.

Recent solo exhibitions include the South London Gallery; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Museum Villa Stuck, Munich; Audain Gallery, Simon Frasier University, Vancouver, B.C.; Kunstmuseum Stuttgart and the MAK, Vienna. The artist has participated in group exhibitions at Witte de With, Rotterdam; the Whitney Museum of American Art, NY; Hayward Gallery, London; KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin; CCA Wattis, San Francisco; MoMA PS1; MAXXI Museum, Rome; Swiss Institute, New York; Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin and the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis. Siegel’s work is in public collections including the Whitney Museum of American Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Tate Modern and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

Her films have been screened at the Cannes, Berlin, Toronto and New York Film Festivals, The Museum of Modern Art, New York and The National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. She has been a fellow of the DAAD Berliner-Künstlerprogramm and the Guggenheim Foundation, the Fulton Fellow at The Film Study Center at Harvard University, a recipient of the ICA Boston’s Foster Prize, Sundance Institute and Creative Capital Awards.

She lives and works in New York City.

Amie Siegel
Artist / Multidisciplinary

Amie Siegel works variously between film, photography, performance and installation. Siegel was born in 1974 and grew up in Chicago. She earned a BA from Bard College in 1996 and an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1999.

Recent solo exhibitions include the South London Gallery; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Museum Villa Stuck, Munich; Audain Gallery, Simon Frasier University, Vancouver, B.C.; Kunstmuseum Stuttgart and the MAK, Vienna. The artist has participated in group exhibitions at Witte de With, Rotterdam; the Whitney Museum of American Art, NY; Hayward Gallery, London; KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin; CCA Wattis, San Francisco; MoMA PS1; MAXXI Museum, Rome; Swiss Institute, New York; Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin and the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis. Siegel’s work is in public collections including the Whitney Museum of American Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Tate Modern and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

Her films have been screened at the Cannes, Berlin, Toronto and New York Film Festivals, The Museum of Modern Art, New York and The National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. She has been a fellow of the DAAD Berliner-Künstlerprogramm and the Guggenheim Foundation, the Fulton Fellow at The Film Study Center at Harvard University, a recipient of the ICA Boston’s Foster Prize, Sundance Institute and Creative Capital Awards.

She lives and works in New York City.

  • Ian Waelder: Here not today
    Apr 18 – Jun 9, 2024
    Super Super Markt
    Berlin, Germany
    I. Language We could say that this exhibition begins with the artist’s daily walk to buy the newspaper at a kiosk. In his book The Practice of Everyday Life, Michel de Certeau describes the city as a text shaped by the people who walk in it daily. A vast text we write with our steps but cannot read – “the networks of these moving, intersecting writings compose a manifold story that has neither author nor spectator (more…)
  • Emir Šehanović: There Will Be Bliss
    Mar 22 – Jun 1, 2024
    Trotoar Gallery
    Zagreb, Croatia
    “Why aren’t revolutions started by the most humane people? Because humane people don’t start revolutions, they start libraries… and cemeteries.” Jean-Luc Godard, Notre Musique There is a world of tangible objects. But there is also another reality, one that exists within us. It is shaped by our experiences and the lessons we have learned. While we can suppose that imagination and creativity can, at least in part, identify an individual, we should not forget that the creative process is primarily fostered by a state of “receptiveness”. (more…)