Andrzej Wroblewski
Artist / Painter

In my practice, I need to preserve – and first seize  – a royal generality, and all encompassing cognoscibility; in it I need to encompass everything, that which I have experienced, and a great deal of what I only know (from books, stories), and, finally, even more of that which I don’t know, but which has to be inside of me, because I’m a son, a Pole, an intellectual, a frequent friend, a passer-by, a consoler. However, what I need here is to take well-considered action, subjected to discipline, which would guarantee me an adequate amount of nourishment. I know that by diminishing the influx of sensations, reducing contacts, I heighten my sensitivity.

– Andrzej Wróblewski / Notes, 1948

In a life cut short before the age of 30, Andrzej Wróblewski (1927–57) produced an impressive body of work consisting of paintings, drawings, and prints, and spanning both abstraction and figuration. Stepping against the formula of Polish Colourism that held sway in the art academies at the time, and in a bid to embrace the new doctrine of Socialist Realism, Wróblewski developed an original and distinct visual language.

In 1949, the artist created the “Execution” series comprising eight oil paintings with which he aimed to tackle the subject of the Second World War by also revisiting his own dramatic memories. In August 1941, the artist’s father died of a heart attack at their family home in Vilnius, during a search conducted by the Nazis. Later, when relocating to Kraków with his mother, Wróblewski witnessed the war-ravaged cities and countryside. The disfigured, mangled bodies are captured in different stages of transition between life and death, with the color blue denoting the deceased.

[Documenta]

Andrzej Wroblewski
Artist / Painter

In my practice, I need to preserve – and first seize  – a royal generality, and all encompassing cognoscibility; in it I need to encompass everything, that which I have experienced, and a great deal of what I only know (from books, stories), and, finally, even more of that which I don’t know, but which has to be inside of me, because I’m a son, a Pole, an intellectual, a frequent friend, a passer-by, a consoler. However, what I need here is to take well-considered action, subjected to discipline, which would guarantee me an adequate amount of nourishment. I know that by diminishing the influx of sensations, reducing contacts, I heighten my sensitivity.

– Andrzej Wróblewski / Notes, 1948

In a life cut short before the age of 30, Andrzej Wróblewski (1927–57) produced an impressive body of work consisting of paintings, drawings, and prints, and spanning both abstraction and figuration. Stepping against the formula of Polish Colourism that held sway in the art academies at the time, and in a bid to embrace the new doctrine of Socialist Realism, Wróblewski developed an original and distinct visual language.

In 1949, the artist created the “Execution” series comprising eight oil paintings with which he aimed to tackle the subject of the Second World War by also revisiting his own dramatic memories. In August 1941, the artist’s father died of a heart attack at their family home in Vilnius, during a search conducted by the Nazis. Later, when relocating to Kraków with his mother, Wróblewski witnessed the war-ravaged cities and countryside. The disfigured, mangled bodies are captured in different stages of transition between life and death, with the color blue denoting the deceased.

[Documenta]

  • Adrianna Ault: Levee
    Publication
    Void
    International
    Adrianna Ault was raised in New Orleans where a 350 mile levee system controls and holds back flood waters. This project began as Ault attempted to better understand the landscape surrounding the city, but evolved over the course of 5-years to encompass her changing family, journeys they took and the processing of grief. The levee became a metaphor for the barriers built in an attempt to ward off inevitable decline, and the onslaught of time and nature. (more…)
  • An-My Lê: Between Two Rivers
    Nov 5, 2023 – Mar 16, 2024
    MoMA
    New York, USA
    For 30 years, the photographs of artist An-My Lê have engaged the complex fictions that inform how we justify, represent, and mythologize warfare and other forms of conflict. Lê does not take a straightforward photojournalistic approach to depicting combat. Rather, with poetic attention to politics and landscape, she meditates on the meaning of perpetual violence, war’s environmental impact, and the significance of diaspora. (more…)
  • Mikel Bastida: Anarene
    Publication
    Tipi Photo Bookshop
    International
    Anarene is a book that was born from an eight-year photographic project made by Mikel Bastida in the United States. In the spirit of referencing the ghost town in Archer County, Texas, portrayed in Peter Bogdanovich’s film adaptation of Larry McMurtry’s novel The Last Picture Show, the author has traveled the country looking for images and stories that cinema has left behind. (more…)
  • Patrick Pound: Windows
    Publication
    Perimeter
    International
    In Windows, Pound’s first photobook with Perimeter Editions, we find a cross-section of images lifted from a single category in Pound’s vast collection of 70,000 photographs. Each of the ‘found’ photographs in this new book features a window seen from the outside. We are allowed to look through them, from the privacy of our own homes. We see ghostly figures and happy families; we see actors acting, and everyday folks acting up; we see real and imagined worlds. (more…)