Angela Davis Johnson
Angela Davis Johnson
Artist
Featured Profile

Angela Davis Johnson creates paintings, public art installations, and ritual performances to examine the technologies of black people, in particular black women/femme. She merges art and contemplative practices to generate works that bring personal and communal visioning around ending poverty, displacement, and state sanctioned violence. Davis Johnson incorporates body movement and sound alongside her vibrant narrative paintings which consist of portraits created with paint, scrap paper, found objects, and fabric.

  • Emily Ferguson: It Girl.
    Jun 1 – Jul 13, 2024
    Nicodim Gallery
    Los Angeles, USA

    What’s an It Girl? An image of an seraphic figure, glowing almost too bright to be looked at until the flashbulbs recharge and the cameras become visible. Glamoured, the viewer is still seeing spots and rubbing their eyes as the figure stalks out of view, no-one quite sure if she’s real or not, an apparition disappeared. An apparition, by its very nature is uncertain, the intention defined by the person who sees it – The angel becomes a monster if enough people describe it so. (more…)

  • Georg Kussmann: FRG
    Publication
    MACK
    International

    The German dramatist Heiner Müller observed that German history lies as if smothered by a rheumatism blanket: beneath there is warmth and stagnation, just enough to give the impression all is well, while the peripheries are freezing. Georg Kussmann’s photographs in FRG were created under this metaphoric blanket. Made in the Federal Republic of Germany over a single summer, they depict everyday scenes of life, work, and leisure (more…)

  • Silke Schönfeld: No More Butter Scenes
    Jun 27–30, 2024
    Kunsthalle Münster
    Münster, Germany

    The video installation No More Butter Scenes (2024) examines the relationship between consent and intimacy in the context of the acting profession. In 2007, around 35 years after the premiere of Tango in Paris (1972), actress Maria Schneider spoke for the first time about the sexual abuse she experienced during the shooting of the infamous butter scene. Director Bernardo Bertolucci argued that it was only by not informing his leading actress in advance of how the scene with co-star Marlon Brando would take place that he was able to capture her authentic frustration and anger. (more…)

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