Taysir Batniji, Disruptions
Taysir Batniji: Disruptions
Publication
Loose Joints
International

Batniji’s disrupted images visualise both the current violence and historical repression imposed on Palestine through digitally degraded images of video calls with his family in Gaza. Palestinian artist Taysir Batniji’s diverse practice is often tinged with impermanence and fragility, drawing inspiration from his subjective experience and its relation to current events and history. In Disruptions, Batniji collects fragmented screenshots taken between 24 April 2015 and 23 June 2017 during several WhatsApp video conversations with his mother and family in Gaza. Settled in Europe and unable to return to his homeland for years, this digital commons provided a crucial meeting ground for Batniji and his family: a digital space nonetheless shaped and destabilised by the same forces affecting the artist’s relatives in everyday life.

Disruptions oscillates between the casual domestic language of the family phonecall and warped, degraded compositions, saturated with colour, obliterated with pixels, eradicated by distance. Through resolution and compression, Batniji’s poor images politically visualize how communication and daily life in Gaza are compromised by conflict, control and surveillance. In their noise and visual obliqueness, Batniji creates a thread between common intimacy and the colonial, now genocidal violence imposed upon Gaza to date, while evoking the physical and emotional separation that occurs across borders.

Announced on the 75th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the publication of Disruptions calls for peace and stands in support of the legitimate struggle for Palestinian freedom. 100% of the profits will go towards the NGO Medical Aid Palestine, providing crucial medical care and support on the ground.

128 pages, 155 × 216 mm, 60 colour plates
Section-sewn debossed softcover
With an essay in French, Arabic and English by Taous R. Dahmani
Designed & Published by Loose Joints
ISBN 978-1-912719-52-5
LJ195, shipping January 2024

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