Sojourner Truth Parsons, 2021
The New Bend
Feb 3 – Apr 2, 2022
Hauser & Wirth
New York City, USA

Curated by Legacy Russell, Executive Director & Chief Curator of The Kitchen, The New Bend brings together 12 contemporary artists working in the raced, classed, and gendered traditions of quilting and textile practice–Anthony Akinbola, Eddie R. Aparicio, Dawn Williams Boyd, Diedrick Brackens, Tuesday Smillie, Tomashi Jackson, Genesis Jerez, Basil Kincaid, Eric N. Mack, Sojourner Truth Parsons, Qualeasha Wood, and Zadie Xa. Their unique visual vernacular exists in tender dialogue with, and in homage to, the contributions of the Gee’s Bend Alabama quilters – Black American women in collective cooperation and creative economic production – and their enduring legacy as a radical meeting place, a prompt, and as intergenerational inspiration. This exhibition acknowledges the work of Gee’s Bend quilters such as Sarah Benning (b. 1933), Missouri Pettway (1902–1981), Lizzie Major (1922–2011), Sally Bennett Jones (1944–1988), Mary Lee Bendolph (b.1935), and so many more, as central to expanded histories of abstraction and modernism.

Curated by Legacy Russell

  • Mikko Takkunen: Hong Kong
    Publication
    Kehrer Verlag
    International

    With his first photobook Hong Kong, The New York Times’ photo editor Mikko Takkunen captured one of the world’s greatest metropolises during a time of political uncertainty and the pandemic. As the city was still recovering from the aftermath of the anti-government protests of 2019, Takkunen began to concentrate on the purity of seeing and capturing the world anew. (more…)

  • Dorothy Sing Zhang: Like Someone Alive
    Publication
    Art Paper Editions / APE
    International

    Dorothy Sing Zhang unveils a compelling portrayal of humanity’s vulnerable state during sleep. The scene is set in the bedrooms of others. One is asked to be asleep, a squeeze cable release is placed under the pillow. The chance of one’s unconscious body rolling over and triggering the camera results in an exposure. Like Someone Alive expands these boundaries by withdrawing the traditional relationships between the photographer, the object and the camera. (more…)