Photo David Levene / The Guardian
Banu Cennetoglu
Artist / Photographer

Banu Cennetoğlu studied psychology in Istanbul and photography in New York and Paris before completing her education at Amsterdam’s Rijksakademie in 2003. She returned to Istanbul in 2005 establishing BAS, a non-profit project space dedicated to collecting and publishing artists’ books in 2006.

Cennetoğlu’s work reflects her fascination with books, archives and collections; their form and function and how they hold, preserve and circulate information. There is also an acute attention to the written word and printed image, the transmission of ideas and beliefs through symbols and signs. Working with a range of different media and often in a highly collaborative way, she has involved a range of institutions and individuals – from artisanal bookbinders to a ‘Habitat and Human Energy Rebalancing Coach’– in the production of her works.

In 2009 Cennetoğlu produced an exhibition entitled ‘CATALOG’ for the Pavilion of Turkey at the Venice Biennale. Described as a 904 page ‘mail-order catalogue’ it is her largest photographic project, presenting 451 of her photographs (from 1993 to 2007) in 15 categories in one book. Each image was made freely available online as a digital file that could be downloaded from a website during the exhibition. The work pays homage to the notion of an artist book, or an exhibition in book format and the democratization of art through publishing and digital technologies. It might also be seen as a self-made retrospective or a personal archive made public.

More recently she has exhibited a series of unique reference libraries that represent every newspaper published in one country, on a single day. The newspapers are organized alphabetically by their titles and presented as a series of black, hardback volumes that can be browsed freely whilst on display. The spine of each volume is embossed with the date of the collection, which is also the title of the work. This ongoing project has been realized thus far in Turkey, ‘28.08.2010’; Switzerland, ‘14.01.2011’; 20 Arabic speaking countries ’02.11.2011’; Cyprus ’29.06.2012’; the United Kingdom ’04.09.2014’ and Germany ’11.08.2015’.

This practice of making an archive and mapping a chosen territory – revealing something of its culture, values and self-image – can be identified in other projects.

[Berliner Künstlerprogramm des DAAD]

Banu Cennetoglu
Artist / Photographer

Banu Cennetoğlu studied psychology in Istanbul and photography in New York and Paris before completing her education at Amsterdam’s Rijksakademie in 2003. She returned to Istanbul in 2005 establishing BAS, a non-profit project space dedicated to collecting and publishing artists’ books in 2006.

Cennetoğlu’s work reflects her fascination with books, archives and collections; their form and function and how they hold, preserve and circulate information. There is also an acute attention to the written word and printed image, the transmission of ideas and beliefs through symbols and signs. Working with a range of different media and often in a highly collaborative way, she has involved a range of institutions and individuals – from artisanal bookbinders to a ‘Habitat and Human Energy Rebalancing Coach’– in the production of her works.

In 2009 Cennetoğlu produced an exhibition entitled ‘CATALOG’ for the Pavilion of Turkey at the Venice Biennale. Described as a 904 page ‘mail-order catalogue’ it is her largest photographic project, presenting 451 of her photographs (from 1993 to 2007) in 15 categories in one book. Each image was made freely available online as a digital file that could be downloaded from a website during the exhibition. The work pays homage to the notion of an artist book, or an exhibition in book format and the democratization of art through publishing and digital technologies. It might also be seen as a self-made retrospective or a personal archive made public.

More recently she has exhibited a series of unique reference libraries that represent every newspaper published in one country, on a single day. The newspapers are organized alphabetically by their titles and presented as a series of black, hardback volumes that can be browsed freely whilst on display. The spine of each volume is embossed with the date of the collection, which is also the title of the work. This ongoing project has been realized thus far in Turkey, ‘28.08.2010’; Switzerland, ‘14.01.2011’; 20 Arabic speaking countries ’02.11.2011’; Cyprus ’29.06.2012’; the United Kingdom ’04.09.2014’ and Germany ’11.08.2015’.

This practice of making an archive and mapping a chosen territory – revealing something of its culture, values and self-image – can be identified in other projects.

[Berliner Künstlerprogramm des DAAD]

  • Nasan Tur: Hunted
    May 26, 2023 – Apr 1, 2024
    Berlinische Galerie
    Berlin, Germany
    Nasan Tur explores the political and social conditions that define our times. His works are experimental arrangements that draw attention to ideologies, social norms and behavioural codes and expand our options for individual action. To this end, he examines statements, gestures and images found in the media or in the public space and distils them into miniatures reflecting current social crises and discourse. (more…)
  • Bára Prášilová: Circles
    Publication
    PositiF
    International
    The first comprehensive book by photographer and visual artist Bára Prašilová summarizing her work over the past 15 years. The editor of the book, Thomas Beachdel, characterizes her work as “pictures of wonder” balancing on the edge of beauty and strangeness, reality and fantasy, tenderness and violence, which stems from the author’s sense of the absurd. (more…)
  • Adrián Balseca: Routing Rubber
    Jan 19 – Mar 30, 2024
    Canal Projects
    New York, USA
    ROUTING RUBBER (January 19th – March 30th, 2024), showcases Ecuadorian artist Adrián Balseca’s (Quito, b. 1989) research on the plantation rubber industry in the Amazon. Produced on black and white, 16mm film, The Skin of Labour (2016) and its accompanying archive, provide a historical revision of the Amazon’s rubber boom, which saw its highest production from the years 1879 to 1912. Through the project, Balseca challenges the idea of the Amazon as a natural horizon, centering this territory as the origin of industrial modernity. (more…)