My personal work speaks mostly about the inner and hidden feelings inside me. I think that it is impossible to separate how I feel from what I represent in my images.

When I was younger I used to draw a lot and create things. I’ve always felt an urge to express myself. Later on, growing up, this urge was shifted on photography. Like most of the teenage girls, I was insecure about myself, my body and my face. It was such a struggle standing the gaze, anyone’s gaze. And I also couldn’t stand the view of myself from the outside.

But then, mostly during the Academy studies, I started putting myself both behind and in front of the camera. I became the subject of my own photographs, and so of my own gaze. I tried to look at myself without any construction, any social construction on me as a woman, as a body.
Although my work literally contains all of me, my body and my feelings, I’m willing to step forward and speak about a general condition of discomfort in a society that puts lots of pressure on women and their images.

Another important issue in my work is love. Or rather, what we call “love” but which contains a much broader set of sensations. Being in a relationship causes me lots of different ways of feeling. To stand them, I need to understand them. And I try to do that through images and words.

I need to understand how bodies and skin can be bonded, and how bodies suffer the distance from each other. And also I feel really curious about the relationship between a man and his vulnerable intimate naked image reflected in the photographic form.

Nude occurs a lot in my work, not much as an erotic symbol, but more as a primordial way to communicate. Sometimes it becomes a provocation but again, not a provocative wink to the spectator, instead more a “declaration of possession” that allows me to represent myself as I want.

Beatrice Lezzi
Artist / Photographer

I’m focused on a work that began with my BA thesis, in which the centre point is the figure of Venus. I took her as a metaphoric symbol of both sublimation and oppression that concerns woman as a body, a presence and an image in the world. Everything unfolds in the continuous asking of conflicting questions: Venus as a saint or a whore, Venus as a dead symbol or as something that needs to resurrect. Is our body something sacred or obscene? Who decides? Where does boundaries stand? I don’t give answers, but a space of impressions, in which the eye is led to multiple layers and the mind can make its own conclusions.

Beatrice Lezzi
Artist / Photographer

I’m focused on a work that began with my BA thesis, in which the centre point is the figure of Venus. I took her as a metaphoric symbol of both sublimation and oppression that concerns woman as a body, a presence and an image in the world. Everything unfolds in the continuous asking of conflicting questions: Venus as a saint or a whore, Venus as a dead symbol or as something that needs to resurrect. Is our body something sacred or obscene? Who decides? Where does boundaries stand? I don’t give answers, but a space of impressions, in which the eye is led to multiple layers and the mind can make its own conclusions.

My personal work speaks mostly about the inner and hidden feelings inside me. I think that it is impossible to separate how I feel from what I represent in my images.

When I was younger I used to draw a lot and create things. I’ve always felt an urge to express myself. Later on, growing up, this urge was shifted on photography. Like most of the teenage girls, I was insecure about myself, my body and my face. It was such a struggle standing the gaze, anyone’s gaze. And I also couldn’t stand the view of myself from the outside.

But then, mostly during the Academy studies, I started putting myself both behind and in front of the camera. I became the subject of my own photographs, and so of my own gaze. I tried to look at myself without any construction, any social construction on me as a woman, as a body.
Although my work literally contains all of me, my body and my feelings, I’m willing to step forward and speak about a general condition of discomfort in a society that puts lots of pressure on women and their images.

Another important issue in my work is love. Or rather, what we call “love” but which contains a much broader set of sensations. Being in a relationship causes me lots of different ways of feeling. To stand them, I need to understand them. And I try to do that through images and words.

I need to understand how bodies and skin can be bonded, and how bodies suffer the distance from each other. And also I feel really curious about the relationship between a man and his vulnerable intimate naked image reflected in the photographic form.

Nude occurs a lot in my work, not much as an erotic symbol, but more as a primordial way to communicate. Sometimes it becomes a provocation but again, not a provocative wink to the spectator, instead more a “declaration of possession” that allows me to represent myself as I want.

  • Re-Stor(y)ing Oceania
    Mar 23 – Oct 13, 2024
    Ocean Space
    Venice, Italy
    TBA21–Academy announces Re-Stor(y)ing Oceania, a new exhibition comprising two new site-specific commissions by Indigenous practitioners from the Pacific, Latai Taumoepeau and Elisapeta Hinemoa Heta. The exhibition is curated by Bougainville-born artist Taloi Havini, returning to Ocean Space after her 2021 solo exhibition. Re-Stor(y)ing Oceania platforms artists and communities who live and work in the vast and diverse region of islands and atolls (more…)
  • Julianknxx: Chorus in Rememory of Flight
    Mar 22 – May 25, 2024
    Metro 54
    Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    It is with honor and pleasure that Metro54 opens the year with a thought-provoking exhibition by poet, artist, and filmmaker Julianknxx, accompanied by a public program that offers a melody to Black diasporic life. The project marks the start of Metro54’s multi-year program, Seasons of Diasporic Life, that zooms into Black diasporic cultural practices and the ways artists and cultural producers address, document, reflect deeply or imagine otherwise the urgency of Black social life and realities in Fortress Europe. (more…)
  • Adraint Khadafhi Bereal: The Black Yearbook
    Publication
    4 Color Books / Penguin Random House
    International
    When photographer Adraint Bereal graduated from the University of Texas, he self-published an impressive volume of portraits, personal statements, and interviews that explored UT’s campus culture and offered an intimate look at the lives of Black students matriculating within a majority white space. Bereal’s work was inspired by his first photo exhibition at the George Washington Carver Museum in Austin, entitled 1.7, that unearthed the experiences of the 925 Black men that made up just 1.7% of UT’s total 52,000 student body. (more…)
  • Anish Kapoor: Unseen
    Apr 11 – Oct 20, 2024
    ARKEN
    Ishøj, Denmark
    Anish Kapoor’s monumental sculptures and installations speak directly to our senses and emotions. Through his unique eye for materials, shapes, colours and surfaces we are drawn into and seduced by his artwork, which turns the world upside down – often quite literally. Kapoor has been shown in the largest exhibition venues in the world, and he has also created several significant pieces for public spaces. (more…)
  • Grey Crawford. Chroma, 1978–85, Vol 1
    Publication
    Beam Editions
    International
    In 1978 Grey Crawford created a body of colour photographic work that was so radical in its aesthetic and technique that few people to this day understand how it was made. Chroma documents late 70s Los Angeles in a period of radical urban transformation. Scenes of vernacular architecture, demolition sites and everyday places are contrasted with graphic forms that float on the surface and sit within the image. (more…)