Danh Vo
Artist / Sculptor

Danish artist Danh Vo (b. 1975, Bà Rịa, Vietnam) dissects the public forces and private desires that define individual experience. His work addresses sweeping cultural and political themes, but refracts them through intimate personal narratives – what the artist calls “the tiny diasporas of a person’s life.” Seen together in this survey exhibition, the sculptures, photographs, and works on paper that he has created over the past fifteen years circle a central paradox: that the self is plural and inherently fluid, yet decisively shaped by larger power structures.

Emerging from personal relationships and fortuitous encounters, Vo’s projects take their final form as objects and images that have accrued shifting layers of meaning in the world, whether through their former ownership, their proximity to specific events, or their currency as universal icons. A son’s last letter home from a distant land, a father’s cherished wristwatch, a marriage certificate, and a glittering chandelier become charged conduits of history and identity. Vo sometimes presents these items untouched, allowing their internal contradictions to quietly unravel through a simple act of re-contextualization. Others are dismembered or combined with new partners in a vivid compression of themes and eras. Within this approach, the artist’s family history – which arcs from wartime Vietnam through displacement and immigration to Europe – is used as a readymade material like any other, intertwining with the many lives and deaths spanning centuries and continents that are evoked.

[Guggenheim]

Danh Vo
Artist / Sculptor

Danish artist Danh Vo (b. 1975, Bà Rịa, Vietnam) dissects the public forces and private desires that define individual experience. His work addresses sweeping cultural and political themes, but refracts them through intimate personal narratives – what the artist calls “the tiny diasporas of a person’s life.” Seen together in this survey exhibition, the sculptures, photographs, and works on paper that he has created over the past fifteen years circle a central paradox: that the self is plural and inherently fluid, yet decisively shaped by larger power structures.

Emerging from personal relationships and fortuitous encounters, Vo’s projects take their final form as objects and images that have accrued shifting layers of meaning in the world, whether through their former ownership, their proximity to specific events, or their currency as universal icons. A son’s last letter home from a distant land, a father’s cherished wristwatch, a marriage certificate, and a glittering chandelier become charged conduits of history and identity. Vo sometimes presents these items untouched, allowing their internal contradictions to quietly unravel through a simple act of re-contextualization. Others are dismembered or combined with new partners in a vivid compression of themes and eras. Within this approach, the artist’s family history – which arcs from wartime Vietnam through displacement and immigration to Europe – is used as a readymade material like any other, intertwining with the many lives and deaths spanning centuries and continents that are evoked.

[Guggenheim]

  • June Clark: Witness
    May 3 – Aug 11, 2024
    The Power Plant
    Toronto, Canada
    June Clark: Witness is the first survey in Canada of the Toronto-based artist June Clark, who, since the late 1960s, has developed a unique and groundbreaking practice spanning photo-based work, text, collage, installation, and sculptural assemblages. Born in Harlem, New York, Clark immigrated to Canada in 1968 and subsequently made Toronto her home. The questions of identity formation and their connection to our points of origin fuel her practice. (more…)
  • Immemory
    Apr 12 – Jun 30, 2024
    Keelung Museum of Art
    Keelung City, Taiwan
    Immemory, “bē-kì-tit” in Taiwanese, is a memory project focusing on the “historical turn” in contemporary art over the past decade in specifically the local context of Keelung. The exhibition considers historical objects and facts as the “thing-in-itself,” aiming to explore Foucault’s concept of “historical a priori” through self-reflexive historiography. The project presents five leitmotifs: “archive fever,” “cold cold war,” “things as the historical a priori,” “politics of exosomatic memory,” and “settler colonialism vs colonialism.” (more…)
  • Ernie Barnes: In Rapture
    Apr 25 – Jun 15, 2024
    Ortuzar Projects
    New York, USA
    Ortuzar Projects is pleased to present Ernie Barnes: In Rapture, the gallery’s first exhibition of the late figurative painter Ernie Barnes (1938-2009) in collaboration with Andrew Kreps Gallery. Spanning five decades of Barnes’ career, this survey features genre paintings of sports, dance, musical performance and the joys of everyday life in his signature “neo-mannerist” style. Tracing the throughlines of elation and bodily movement throughout Barnes’ oeuvre (more…)