Practice/Statement:

I shoot on a large format camera (8 x 10 or 4 x 5 film) and this can bring a heightened sense of reality to the images. This becomes even more apparent when printed large scale for exhibition. The details are clearer and become more important. Shooting on Large Format is the way I have always worked. It involves thinking more about what you are about to shoot and then trusting your instinct. With no Polaroid or instant digital image to work with, the pre planning and thought leading up to the shoot is transmitted to the first shot. Shooting in this way can produce a staged image, however in the book “Teenage Pre-occupation” it is the subject matter that gives the resulting images a more naturalistic quality, and ultimately the impression of social documentation.

David Stewart
Photographer

David Stewart began his career by photographing punk bands including The Clash and The Ramones. He also took to photographing the passing parade of colorful characters on Morecambe Promenade with squirrel monkey’s Joey and Queenie.

After graduating at Blackpool and The Fylde College, Stewart moved to London in 1981 where he pursued a career in photography, rapidly establishing himself as one of the UK’s most highly accomplished photographers.

In 1995 he directed and produced a short film “Cabbage” which was nominated for a BAFTA. Accompanying the film is a series of surrealist photographic images in tribute to the much-maligned vegetable.

In 2001 he published a body of work titled “Fogeys” comprising of kitsch, cartoon-like photographs of people growing old disgracefully. Exhibited at the Institute of Contemporary Art London “Fogeys” won a Silver Award at the Art Directors Club of New York.

The book “Thrice Removed” was published in 2009.

While still singular and mischievous, the book includes works that are more muted in color and personal in tone.

The projects “Indecision” and “Intension” return once again to the surreal providing an intriguing study of young women.

“Teenage Pre-occupation” which takes a look at teenagers and the changes they go through and was published in May 2013.

The short film “Stray” 2013 was screened at the London Short Film festival.

Stewart won The Taylor Wessing portrait prize in 2015.

He had been previously shortlisted for the Photographic Portrait Prize in 2007 and accepted a further fourteen times between 1995 and 2012 each time exhibited at the National Portrait Gallery, London.

In 2016 Stewart was presented with The Royal Photographic Society award for outstanding achievement and excellence in the fields of Editorial, Advertising and Fashion Photography.

2018 saw the publication of “Paid Content” which uses the setting of the advertising agency to explore the changing face of workplace culture and the wider dehumanizing effect that is occurring due to the growth of large, faceless corporations and globalization.

David Stewart
Photographer

David Stewart began his career by photographing punk bands including The Clash and The Ramones. He also took to photographing the passing parade of colorful characters on Morecambe Promenade with squirrel monkey’s Joey and Queenie.

After graduating at Blackpool and The Fylde College, Stewart moved to London in 1981 where he pursued a career in photography, rapidly establishing himself as one of the UK’s most highly accomplished photographers.

In 1995 he directed and produced a short film “Cabbage” which was nominated for a BAFTA. Accompanying the film is a series of surrealist photographic images in tribute to the much-maligned vegetable.

In 2001 he published a body of work titled “Fogeys” comprising of kitsch, cartoon-like photographs of people growing old disgracefully. Exhibited at the Institute of Contemporary Art London “Fogeys” won a Silver Award at the Art Directors Club of New York.

The book “Thrice Removed” was published in 2009.

While still singular and mischievous, the book includes works that are more muted in color and personal in tone.

The projects “Indecision” and “Intension” return once again to the surreal providing an intriguing study of young women.

“Teenage Pre-occupation” which takes a look at teenagers and the changes they go through and was published in May 2013.

The short film “Stray” 2013 was screened at the London Short Film festival.

Stewart won The Taylor Wessing portrait prize in 2015.

He had been previously shortlisted for the Photographic Portrait Prize in 2007 and accepted a further fourteen times between 1995 and 2012 each time exhibited at the National Portrait Gallery, London.

In 2016 Stewart was presented with The Royal Photographic Society award for outstanding achievement and excellence in the fields of Editorial, Advertising and Fashion Photography.

2018 saw the publication of “Paid Content” which uses the setting of the advertising agency to explore the changing face of workplace culture and the wider dehumanizing effect that is occurring due to the growth of large, faceless corporations and globalization.

Practice/Statement:

I shoot on a large format camera (8 x 10 or 4 x 5 film) and this can bring a heightened sense of reality to the images. This becomes even more apparent when printed large scale for exhibition. The details are clearer and become more important. Shooting on Large Format is the way I have always worked. It involves thinking more about what you are about to shoot and then trusting your instinct. With no Polaroid or instant digital image to work with, the pre planning and thought leading up to the shoot is transmitted to the first shot. Shooting in this way can produce a staged image, however in the book “Teenage Pre-occupation” it is the subject matter that gives the resulting images a more naturalistic quality, and ultimately the impression of social documentation.

  • Roni Horn: Give Me Paradox or Give Me Death
    Mar 23 – Aug 11, 2024
    Museum Ludwig
    Köln, Germany
    Mu­se­um Lud­wig is pleased to pre­sent Roni Horn: Give Me Para­dox or Give Me Death, a so­lo ex­hi­bi­tion of works by in­flu­en­tial Amer­i­can artist Roni Horn. The ex­hi­bi­tion in­cludes over 100 works, span­n­ing from the be­gin­n­ing of the artist’s de­cades long ca­reer to pre­sent day. Roni Horn’s work spans from pho­tog­ra­phy to draw­ing, artist books, sculp­ture, and in­s­tal­la­tion. Be­hind this open­ness lies the artist’s un­der­s­tand­ing that ev­ery­thing in the world is mutable (more…)
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    Publication
    teNeues
    International
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    Galerie Anton Janizewski
    Berlin, Germany
    The Okavango River demarcates the border between Angola and Namibia across a stretch of more than 400 kilometers. This boundary between the two countries is fortified by the thousands of crocodiles that live in the river. The uncle of Angolan-South African artist Helena Uambembe also once guarded this border. After fleeing civil war-torn Angola, he and the rest of Uambembe’s family lived on the southern side of the Okavango in what was then South West Africa as part of the 32nd Regiment of the South African Apartheid Army (more…)
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