Documenta
organization / festival

Documenta und Museum Fridericianum gGmbH is a non-profit organization supported and funded by the City of Kassel and the State of Hesse, as well as by the German Federal Cultural Foundation.

In 1955, the Kassel painter and academy professor Arnold Bode endeavored to bring Germany back into dialogue with the rest of the world after the end of World War II, and to connect the international art scene through a “presentation of twentieth century art.” He founded the “Society of Western Art of the 20th Century” in order to present art that had been deemed by the Nazis as degenerate as well as works from classical modernity that had never been seen in Germany in the destroyed Museum Fridericianum.

The first Documenta was a retrospective of works from major movements (Fauvism, Expressionism, Cubism, the Blaue Reiter, Futurism) and brilliant individualists such as Pablo Picasso, Max Ernst, Hans Arp, Henri Matisse, Wassily Kandinsky, and Henry Moore. In this journey through the art of the first fifty years of the century, German founders of modern art such as Paul Klee, Oskar Schlemmer, or Max Beckmann were presented alongside classics of modernism.

Each Documenta takes its character from the ideas and concept of its Artistic Director, and is therefore not only a forum for current trends in contemporary art, but a place where innovative and standards-setting exhibition concepts are tried. In each edition, Documenta has played a leading role in taking the international discourse about art in new directions. Over the past decades, Documenta has established itself as an institution that goes far beyond a survey of what is currently happening, inviting the attention of the international art world every five years for this “museum of 100 days.” The discourse and the dynamics of the discussion surrounding each Documenta reflects and challenges the expectations of society about art.

Documenta
organization / festival

Documenta und Museum Fridericianum gGmbH is a non-profit organization supported and funded by the City of Kassel and the State of Hesse, as well as by the German Federal Cultural Foundation.

In 1955, the Kassel painter and academy professor Arnold Bode endeavored to bring Germany back into dialogue with the rest of the world after the end of World War II, and to connect the international art scene through a “presentation of twentieth century art.” He founded the “Society of Western Art of the 20th Century” in order to present art that had been deemed by the Nazis as degenerate as well as works from classical modernity that had never been seen in Germany in the destroyed Museum Fridericianum.

The first Documenta was a retrospective of works from major movements (Fauvism, Expressionism, Cubism, the Blaue Reiter, Futurism) and brilliant individualists such as Pablo Picasso, Max Ernst, Hans Arp, Henri Matisse, Wassily Kandinsky, and Henry Moore. In this journey through the art of the first fifty years of the century, German founders of modern art such as Paul Klee, Oskar Schlemmer, or Max Beckmann were presented alongside classics of modernism.

Each Documenta takes its character from the ideas and concept of its Artistic Director, and is therefore not only a forum for current trends in contemporary art, but a place where innovative and standards-setting exhibition concepts are tried. In each edition, Documenta has played a leading role in taking the international discourse about art in new directions. Over the past decades, Documenta has established itself as an institution that goes far beyond a survey of what is currently happening, inviting the attention of the international art world every five years for this “museum of 100 days.” The discourse and the dynamics of the discussion surrounding each Documenta reflects and challenges the expectations of society about art.

  • Zheng Chongbin: Immeasurable Things
    Mar 21 – Jun 1, 2024
    Galerie du Monde
    Hong Kong
    Zheng Chongbin’s (b.1961 in Shanghai; lives in San Francisco) visual philosophy form ties between phenomenology and New Materialism. Zheng’s hybrid practice of painting, video and light space installation investigate the spectrum of perception through the experience of self and being. Presented at gdm Hong Kong is an installation showcasing an intertwined and destabilized space, where the boundaries between human, technology and environment blur. (more…)
  • How Not to Be Seen
    May 10 – Sep 8, 2024
    Remai Modern
    Saskatoon, Canada
    We may not always be aware of it, but we live in an era of continuous scrutiny. Modern technology captures, distributes, and analyzes images and data at ever-increasing rates. We are all subjects of tracking, not only by cameras employed purportedly as a deterrent for crime but also by digital tools used by corporations and governments alike to monitor and evaluate our actions, needs, and desires. (more…)