Dod Procter
Artist / Painter

Doris ‘Shaw “Dod” (Hampstead, London 1890) started her art studies early at the age of fifteen at the Stanhope and Elizabeth Forbes’ art school.

In 1910, she started her studies at the Atelier Colorossi, where she was inspired by the impressionist and post-impressionist painters, especially Cezanne and Renoir.

Through the 1920s she specialized in painting the figure, usually single female figures, sometimes nude, others in softly draped clothes.

She received early recognition with her painting “Morning” which was received as Picture of the Year at the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition of 1927 and purchased for the nation by the Daily Mail newspaper for the Tate Gallery.

Dod returned to west Cornwall in 1938, occasionally travelling abroad and often exhibiting in London, including at the Royal Academy.

The style of Dod Procter’s later works changed considerably, as did the subject matter, which included landscapes, paintings of children and still-life. She died aged 80.

[edited from Penlee House]

Dod Procter
Artist / Painter

Doris ‘Shaw “Dod” (Hampstead, London 1890) started her art studies early at the age of fifteen at the Stanhope and Elizabeth Forbes’ art school.

In 1910, she started her studies at the Atelier Colorossi, where she was inspired by the impressionist and post-impressionist painters, especially Cezanne and Renoir.

Through the 1920s she specialized in painting the figure, usually single female figures, sometimes nude, others in softly draped clothes.

She received early recognition with her painting “Morning” which was received as Picture of the Year at the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition of 1927 and purchased for the nation by the Daily Mail newspaper for the Tate Gallery.

Dod returned to west Cornwall in 1938, occasionally travelling abroad and often exhibiting in London, including at the Royal Academy.

The style of Dod Procter’s later works changed considerably, as did the subject matter, which included landscapes, paintings of children and still-life. She died aged 80.

[edited from Penlee House]

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