Determined to continue her travels, she researched current events which led her to Standing Rock, North Dakota to report on mass protests against the construction of oil pipelines through Native American land. Here she lived with a tribe not only learning Native American customs but also the building blocks of how to report accurately and ethically.

Emma’s longing for reporting on world issues became more apparent after buying a one-way ticket to Kenya. Here, she lived with a family as she documented daily life, the 2018 presidential elections, Ethiopian refugees in the north of Kenya, and other stories across the country. She prolonged her stay overseas by flying to Lebanon to document women peacekeepers.

Emma decided to invest more in her career and move to Paris, France to be more centrally located to the Middle East and Africa. Here she reported on local news like the Notre Dame Cathedral fire and “Gilet Jaunes” protests. In February 2019, she planned a trip to Nigeria to photograph the presidential elections. Within this trip she also did collaborative work with a community-based NGO that helped build new hospitals and schools in communities, and traveled to the northeast photographing Boko Haram survivor’s stories. Settling back in Paris, she organized a trip to Tunisia where she started work on a story about Libyan fighters receiving medical treatment in Tunis. Just before the pandemic of 2020, Emma documented the protests against the government in Baghdad, Iraq. Just before the country was taken by the Taliban, Emma was working on a collaborative story with EMERGENCY nonprofit hospital in Kabul, Afghanistan and the Legacy of War Foundation. Her latest story was dispatches from the Polish-Ukraine border and in Ukraine just two days after the war started where she focused her work on disabled and elderly refugees. Towards the end of her trip she facilitated over $10,000 worth of wheelchairs for a center helping disabled kids in collaboration with the Legacy of War Foundation.

Emma Francis
Photographer

Emma Francis is a British-American who grew up in a rural, mountainous town in Eastern Oregon. Her small-town upbringing instilled many values, but the biggest she has carried with her is appreciation towards nature and interest for people. Emma’s childhood consisted of hiking, camping, and exploring the world around her uninhibited. She has had the desire to learn all her life and brought this innate curiosity with her on her first solo adventure to Iceland. Knowing she had a love for photography but unsure as to where this passion would take her, she received her first assignment photographing explorers who were kayaking from Greenland to Scotland.

This long journey was a turning point for her career as she discovered this was what she wanted to pursue in life. During this trip, she decided to leave college on top of a mountain and has never regretted it since.

You can find Emma’s work in a variety of places including Al Jazeera, The Intercept, The Photographic Journal, and more. Her story “Reclaiming Iraq” was projected at Visa Pour L’Image 2020 and her photo essay on peacekeepers in Lebanon was exhibited at Xposure Photo Festival 2021.

Emma Francis
Photographer

Emma Francis is a British-American who grew up in a rural, mountainous town in Eastern Oregon. Her small-town upbringing instilled many values, but the biggest she has carried with her is appreciation towards nature and interest for people. Emma’s childhood consisted of hiking, camping, and exploring the world around her uninhibited. She has had the desire to learn all her life and brought this innate curiosity with her on her first solo adventure to Iceland. Knowing she had a love for photography but unsure as to where this passion would take her, she received her first assignment photographing explorers who were kayaking from Greenland to Scotland.

This long journey was a turning point for her career as she discovered this was what she wanted to pursue in life. During this trip, she decided to leave college on top of a mountain and has never regretted it since.

You can find Emma’s work in a variety of places including Al Jazeera, The Intercept, The Photographic Journal, and more. Her story “Reclaiming Iraq” was projected at Visa Pour L’Image 2020 and her photo essay on peacekeepers in Lebanon was exhibited at Xposure Photo Festival 2021.

Determined to continue her travels, she researched current events which led her to Standing Rock, North Dakota to report on mass protests against the construction of oil pipelines through Native American land. Here she lived with a tribe not only learning Native American customs but also the building blocks of how to report accurately and ethically.

Emma’s longing for reporting on world issues became more apparent after buying a one-way ticket to Kenya. Here, she lived with a family as she documented daily life, the 2018 presidential elections, Ethiopian refugees in the north of Kenya, and other stories across the country. She prolonged her stay overseas by flying to Lebanon to document women peacekeepers.

Emma decided to invest more in her career and move to Paris, France to be more centrally located to the Middle East and Africa. Here she reported on local news like the Notre Dame Cathedral fire and “Gilet Jaunes” protests. In February 2019, she planned a trip to Nigeria to photograph the presidential elections. Within this trip she also did collaborative work with a community-based NGO that helped build new hospitals and schools in communities, and traveled to the northeast photographing Boko Haram survivor’s stories. Settling back in Paris, she organized a trip to Tunisia where she started work on a story about Libyan fighters receiving medical treatment in Tunis. Just before the pandemic of 2020, Emma documented the protests against the government in Baghdad, Iraq. Just before the country was taken by the Taliban, Emma was working on a collaborative story with EMERGENCY nonprofit hospital in Kabul, Afghanistan and the Legacy of War Foundation. Her latest story was dispatches from the Polish-Ukraine border and in Ukraine just two days after the war started where she focused her work on disabled and elderly refugees. Towards the end of her trip she facilitated over $10,000 worth of wheelchairs for a center helping disabled kids in collaboration with the Legacy of War Foundation.

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