Frank Walter
Artist

A talented writer and artist during his lifetime, Frank Walter was an eccentric character now considered to be vastly under-recognized. Intellectually brilliant, Walter entertained delusions of aristocratic grandeur, namely the belief that the white slave-owners in his family linked him to the noble houses of Europe. The self-styled “7th Prince of the West Indies, Lord of Follies and the Ding-a-Ding Nook” produced paintings that dealt with race, class, and social identity, as well as abstract explorations of nuclear energy, portraits both real and imagined – including Hitler playing cricket and Prince Charles and Princess Diana as Adam and Eve – and miniature landscapes of Scotland, the country that he fell in love with during a visit in the 1950s or ’60s. Walter typically painted in oil on rudimentary materials, with a marked immediacy and naivety. The first man of color to manage an Antiguan sugar plantation, Walter spent the last 25 years of his life in an isolated shack in Antigua, surrounded by his writings, paintings, and carvings.

Frank Walter
Artist

A talented writer and artist during his lifetime, Frank Walter was an eccentric character now considered to be vastly under-recognized. Intellectually brilliant, Walter entertained delusions of aristocratic grandeur, namely the belief that the white slave-owners in his family linked him to the noble houses of Europe. The self-styled “7th Prince of the West Indies, Lord of Follies and the Ding-a-Ding Nook” produced paintings that dealt with race, class, and social identity, as well as abstract explorations of nuclear energy, portraits both real and imagined – including Hitler playing cricket and Prince Charles and Princess Diana as Adam and Eve – and miniature landscapes of Scotland, the country that he fell in love with during a visit in the 1950s or ’60s. Walter typically painted in oil on rudimentary materials, with a marked immediacy and naivety. The first man of color to manage an Antiguan sugar plantation, Walter spent the last 25 years of his life in an isolated shack in Antigua, surrounded by his writings, paintings, and carvings.

  • What is Truth?
    Feb 17 – Oct 20, 2024
    Sainsbury Centre
    Norwich, UK
    This year, the Sainsbury Centre is investigating how we can know what is true in the world around us through a series of fascinating, interlinked exhibitions. The dynamic 2024 programme consists of four key, interlinked exhibitions – In Event of Moon Disaster, Liquid Gender, Jeffrey Gibson: no simple word for time and The Camera Never Lies – bringing together some of the world’s leading artists and creative thinkers, plus a new, interlinking publication. (more…)
  • Maria Sturm: You Don’t Look Native to Me
    Publication
    Void
    International
    In 2011, Maria Sturm began to photograph the lives of young people from the Lumbee Tribe around Pembroke, Robeson County, North Carolina. Through the process of documenting their lives, Sturm began to question her own understanding of what it means to be Native American. Her new book You Don’t Look Native to Me combines photographs with interviews and texts to preconceptions and show Native identity not as fixed, but evolving and redefining itself with each generation. (more…)
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