The measure of Kafka’s appeal as a writer was quantified for the public in 1988, when his handwritten manuscript of The Trial was sold at auction for nearly $2 million, at that time the highest price ever paid for a modern manuscript.

The buyer, a German book dealer, gushed after his purchase was finalized. “This is perhaps the most important work in 20th-century German literature,” he said, “and Germany had to have it.”

[edited from biography.com]

Franz Kafka
Writer

Born on July 3, 1883, in Prague, capital of what is now the Czech Republic, writer Franz Kafka grew up in an upper middle-class Jewish family. After studying law at the University of Prague, he worked in insurance and wrote in the evenings. In 1923, he moved to Berlin to focus on writing, but died of tuberculosis shortly after.

His friend Max Brod published most of his work posthumously, such as The Castle and The Trial, the manuscript for which was discovered in loose chapters on his desk after his death.

Incredibly, at the time of his death Kafka’s name was known only to small group of readers. It was only after he died and Max Brod went against the demands of his friend that Kafka and his work gained fame. His books garnered favor during World War II, especially, and greatly influenced German literature.

As the 1960s took shape and Eastern Europe was under the fist of bureaucratic Communist governments, Kafka’s writing resonated particularly strongly with readers. So alive and vibrant were the tales that Kafka spun about man and faceless organizations that a new term was introduced into the English lexicon: “Kafkaesque.”

Franz Kafka
Writer

Born on July 3, 1883, in Prague, capital of what is now the Czech Republic, writer Franz Kafka grew up in an upper middle-class Jewish family. After studying law at the University of Prague, he worked in insurance and wrote in the evenings. In 1923, he moved to Berlin to focus on writing, but died of tuberculosis shortly after.

His friend Max Brod published most of his work posthumously, such as The Castle and The Trial, the manuscript for which was discovered in loose chapters on his desk after his death.

Incredibly, at the time of his death Kafka’s name was known only to small group of readers. It was only after he died and Max Brod went against the demands of his friend that Kafka and his work gained fame. His books garnered favor during World War II, especially, and greatly influenced German literature.

As the 1960s took shape and Eastern Europe was under the fist of bureaucratic Communist governments, Kafka’s writing resonated particularly strongly with readers. So alive and vibrant were the tales that Kafka spun about man and faceless organizations that a new term was introduced into the English lexicon: “Kafkaesque.”

The measure of Kafka’s appeal as a writer was quantified for the public in 1988, when his handwritten manuscript of The Trial was sold at auction for nearly $2 million, at that time the highest price ever paid for a modern manuscript.

The buyer, a German book dealer, gushed after his purchase was finalized. “This is perhaps the most important work in 20th-century German literature,” he said, “and Germany had to have it.”

[edited from biography.com]

  • Hannah Villiger
    Apr 3 – Jul 22, 2024
    Centre Pompidou
    Paris, France
    Bringing together around 100 works and documents from the collections of the Musée National d’Art Moderne and the Estate of Hannah Villiger foundation, this monographic exhibition dedicated to Swiss artist Hannah Villiger is the first of its kind in France. It pays homage to an artistic practice that oscillated between sculpture, photography and spatial architecture, beginning in the early 1970s and evolving until the mid-1990s. (more…)
  • Artadia Awards 2024
    Deadline Nov 1, 2024
    Artadia
    International
    The Artadia Awards provide financial support, exposure and recognition to artists. The awards are unrestricted, allowing artists to use the funds in any way they choose. Each year, an open-call application is made available in each of the seven active partner cities. Supporting artists equitably is a critical part of the Artadia Award process (more…)
  • RAY Echoes. Emotion
    May 3 – Sep 1, 2024
    Museum Angewandte Kunst
    Frankfurt am Main, Germany
    For decades, the art institutions and collections in Frankfurt and the Rhine-Main region have been home to a remarkable density and expertise in the field of photography and related media. Following on from the first four successful editions of RAY the Triennial of Photography, eleven cooperating institutions are once again joining forces to make this focus internationally visible. With exhibitions, numerous events, and a three-day festival on the triennial theme of ECHOES, RAY offers a multifaceted exploration of photography. (more…)
  • Mani Mazinani and Sanaz Mazinani: Dastgāh
    Jun 4 – Oct 31, 2024
    Evergreen Brick Works
    Toronto, Canada
    How do you listen? What do you hear? Nestled in the Don River ravines amidst urban trails and the Don Valley Parkway, Dastgāh is a sound sculpture that asks visitors to open their ears and listen differently. Created by the brother and sister duo Mani Mazinani and Sanaz Mazinani, the instrument takes its title from the Farsi term “dastgāh,” and can be literally translated as a “hand” (dast) and “gāh” (way) or “set of directions,” a modal system that serves as the foundation for composition and improvisation in Iranian music. (more…)
  • Chris Hoare: Seven Hills
    Publication
    RRB Photobooks
    International
    RRB Photobooks is delighted to present Seven Hills, our second publication from Bristol based Photographer, Chris Hoare. Set to release in September 2023, this first edition will feature a special edition of 50 copies, each including a signed and limited print. In Seven Hills, Hoare shows us his unique perspective of Bristol, his hometown. Presenting both the good and the bad, Hoare’s poetic imagery speaks to some of the more serious issues facing the city today (more…)
  • Ernest Cole: A Lens in Exile
    Jun 13 – Oct 12, 2024
    Autograph
    London, UK
    Offering a rare and reflective insight into the seminal South African photographer Ernest Cole, A Lens in Exile is the first exhibition of his photographs documenting New York City during the height of the civil rights movement in America. Best known for his radical images documenting the violence of apartheid, Cole fled South Africa in 1966 and was officially made stateless in 1968. (more…)
  • Michela de Mattei & Toby Christian: Flash_Looking
    May 17 – Jul 5, 2024
    Belmacz
    London, UK
    The phrase ‘flash-looking’ suggests something slick and shiny, a high-gloss finish, a smooth way of operating. As a synchronising of parts, the phrase also suggests a quick glance, a glimpse, something seen out of the of corner of one’s eye: “What’s that”. Flash_Looking, featuring Toby Christian and Michela de Mattei, works through these connotations and more. Brought in dialogue, Toby and Michela’s artworks speak with and across each other with an anachronistic elegance (more…)
  • Chantal Joffe
    Artist
    Featured Profile
    Chantal Joffe brings a combination of insight and integrity, as well as psychological and emotional force, to the genre of figurative art. Hers is a deceptively casual brushstroke. Whether in images a few inches square or ten feet high, fluidity combined with a pragmatic approach to representation seduces and disarms. (more…)
SUBMIT YOUR ANNOUNCEMENTS
Visit our New Announcement Submission page > Announcement Submission page >