El Anatsui
Goodman Gallery
Johannesburg / Cape Town

Goodman Gallery is one of the most distinguished and longest-standing international contemporary art galleries. Established in Johannesburg in 1966, the gallery works with artists who are at once contemporary, influential and strive to shift perspectives and engender social transformation.

Founded during the era of apartheid, Goodman Gallery offered a non-discriminatory space when museums served the agenda of the autocratic government. Since 2008, under the directorship of Liza Essers, Goodman Gallery has expanded on this legacy, shifted its focus, and introduced numerous pivotal curatorial initiatives and partnerships. Essers has promoted a global outlook, while initiating unconventional interventions both within and outside of the traditional gallery space. This approach has dovetailed with an incisive three-tiered focus: working with southern Africa’s most significant artists, both established and emerging; those from the greater African continent; and international artists who engage in a dialogue with the African context.

In 2009 the Goodman Gallery initiated Goodman Projects and to date has presented over twenty progressive and innovative exhibitions, installations and performances. This program, essentially a ‘third space’, provides a platform for non-commercial initiatives, aimed at containing an aesthetic of change and disruption. Goodman Gallery’s program also extends beyond the walls of the gallery to include collaborative projects with major educational and institutional museums in South Africa and internationally. Local initiatives have a non-profit focus, and have arisen from a lack of institutional funding for arts programs in South Africa.

Goodman Gallery
Johannesburg / Cape Town

Goodman Gallery is one of the most distinguished and longest-standing international contemporary art galleries. Established in Johannesburg in 1966, the gallery works with artists who are at once contemporary, influential and strive to shift perspectives and engender social transformation.

Founded during the era of apartheid, Goodman Gallery offered a non-discriminatory space when museums served the agenda of the autocratic government. Since 2008, under the directorship of Liza Essers, Goodman Gallery has expanded on this legacy, shifted its focus, and introduced numerous pivotal curatorial initiatives and partnerships. Essers has promoted a global outlook, while initiating unconventional interventions both within and outside of the traditional gallery space. This approach has dovetailed with an incisive three-tiered focus: working with southern Africa’s most significant artists, both established and emerging; those from the greater African continent; and international artists who engage in a dialogue with the African context.

In 2009 the Goodman Gallery initiated Goodman Projects and to date has presented over twenty progressive and innovative exhibitions, installations and performances. This program, essentially a ‘third space’, provides a platform for non-commercial initiatives, aimed at containing an aesthetic of change and disruption. Goodman Gallery’s program also extends beyond the walls of the gallery to include collaborative projects with major educational and institutional museums in South Africa and internationally. Local initiatives have a non-profit focus, and have arisen from a lack of institutional funding for arts programs in South Africa.

El Anatsui
  • Mikel Bastida: Anarene
    Publication
    Tipi Photo Bookshop
    International
    Anarene is a book that was born from an eight-year photographic project made by Mikel Bastida in the United States. In the spirit of referencing the ghost town in Archer County, Texas, portrayed in Peter Bogdanovich’s film adaptation of Larry McMurtry’s novel The Last Picture Show, the author has traveled the country looking for images and stories that cinema has left behind. (more…)
  • Fumi Nagasaka: Dora, Yerkwood, Walker County, Alabama
    Publication
    Gost
    International
    During the 2016 US Presidential elections Japanese photographer, Fumi Nagasaka, became intrigued by the rural and southern USA. She had lived in New York City for a decade but despite travelling the world, had yet to visit the rest of the US. All this changed when her friend, Tanya Rouse, invited her to her hometown of Dora, Alabama. Nagasaka continued to visit Dora over several years, gradually building a photographic archive of her visits. (more…)