Hannah Höch
Artist

Hannah Höch was a German Dada artist known for her political photomontages. Made from newspaper clippings and found objects, her work often engaged with the early 20th-century ideal of the “New Woman” – one who challenged the traditional domestic role of females. The artist is most commonly associated with her photomontage Cut with the Kitchen Knife through a Beer-Belly of the Weimar Republic (1919-1920), which critiqued the male-dominated political apparatus, a system the artist believed resulted in the failure of the Weimar Republic and the increasing militarization in post-World War I Germany.

Born November 1, 1889 in Gotha, Germany, she studied at the Berlin’s College of Arts and Crafts, training that was not available to many European women at the time. In 1915, Höch formed a romantic relationship with artist Raoul Hausmann, who introduced her to Dadaism – an artistic movement that began in Zurich in response to World War I. In 1926, she split from Haussman and moved to the Netherlands, where she worked alongside several influential artists including Piet Mondrian and Kurt Schwitters. Later in her career, the artist lived in Berlin and was forced to stop showing her work in public after her art was deemed degenerate by the Nazi regime. Höch died on May 31, 1978 in Berlin, Germany. Her work is currently held in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the Berlinische Galerie.

[Artnet]

Hannah Hoch

Hannah Höch
Artist

Hannah Höch was a German Dada artist known for her political photomontages. Made from newspaper clippings and found objects, her work often engaged with the early 20th-century ideal of the “New Woman” – one who challenged the traditional domestic role of females. The artist is most commonly associated with her photomontage Cut with the Kitchen Knife through a Beer-Belly of the Weimar Republic (1919-1920), which critiqued the male-dominated political apparatus, a system the artist believed resulted in the failure of the Weimar Republic and the increasing militarization in post-World War I Germany.

Born November 1, 1889 in Gotha, Germany, she studied at the Berlin’s College of Arts and Crafts, training that was not available to many European women at the time. In 1915, Höch formed a romantic relationship with artist Raoul Hausmann, who introduced her to Dadaism – an artistic movement that began in Zurich in response to World War I. In 1926, she split from Haussman and moved to the Netherlands, where she worked alongside several influential artists including Piet Mondrian and Kurt Schwitters. Later in her career, the artist lived in Berlin and was forced to stop showing her work in public after her art was deemed degenerate by the Nazi regime. Höch died on May 31, 1978 in Berlin, Germany. Her work is currently held in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the Berlinische Galerie.

[Artnet]

Hannah Hoch

  • Georg Kussmann: FRG
    Publication
    MACK
    International
    The German dramatist Heiner Müller observed that German history lies as if smothered by a rheumatism blanket: beneath there is warmth and stagnation, just enough to give the impression all is well, while the peripheries are freezing. Georg Kussmann’s photographs in FRG were created under this metaphoric blanket. Made in the Federal Republic of Germany over a single summer, they depict everyday scenes of life, work, and leisure (more…)
  • Gregory Crewdson: Retrospective
    May 29 – Sep 8, 2024
    Albertina
    Wien, Austria
    Gregory Crewdson (*1962, Brooklyn) is one of the world’s most renowned photographers. Since the mid-1980s, Crewdson has been using the backdrop of small American towns and film sets to create, like a director, technically brilliant and colourfully seductive photographs that focus on human isolation and the abysses of society. The enigmatic scenes self-reflexively raise questions about the boundary between fact and fiction but can also be related to socio-political developments. (more…)
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