Harsha Vadlamani
Photographer

Harsha Vadlamani is an independent photojournalist, filmmaker and National Geographic Explorer whose work explores the many inequalities that influence migration, health and the environment, with a particular focus on rural and indigenous communities across India.

In the summer of 2008, he quit an IT job to work on commissioned projects photographing communities in HIV/AIDS interventions in southern India. Over the next three years, this work resulted in several publications and, more importantly, deepened his understanding of rural India and continues to influence his current work.

In 2021, supported by a grant from the National Geographic Society, he travelled through central India for over 40 days on a motorcycle. He documented how healthcare workers and volunteer doctors worked to counter the devastating impact of COVID-19’s second wave on isolated rural and indigenous communities. The work received Amnesty International UK’s Media Award for Photojournalism in 2022.

His work has appeared in National Geographic, The New York Times Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, GEO, Al Jazeera, Le Monde, Financial Times Magazine, Rest of World, CNN, BBC, Scientific American, Foreign Affairs, Neue Zürcher Zeitung, Nature and Wired, among other publications.

Harsha Vadlamani
Photographer

Harsha Vadlamani is an independent photojournalist, filmmaker and National Geographic Explorer whose work explores the many inequalities that influence migration, health and the environment, with a particular focus on rural and indigenous communities across India.

In the summer of 2008, he quit an IT job to work on commissioned projects photographing communities in HIV/AIDS interventions in southern India. Over the next three years, this work resulted in several publications and, more importantly, deepened his understanding of rural India and continues to influence his current work.

In 2021, supported by a grant from the National Geographic Society, he travelled through central India for over 40 days on a motorcycle. He documented how healthcare workers and volunteer doctors worked to counter the devastating impact of COVID-19’s second wave on isolated rural and indigenous communities. The work received Amnesty International UK’s Media Award for Photojournalism in 2022.

His work has appeared in National Geographic, The New York Times Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, GEO, Al Jazeera, Le Monde, Financial Times Magazine, Rest of World, CNN, BBC, Scientific American, Foreign Affairs, Neue Zürcher Zeitung, Nature and Wired, among other publications.

  • How Not to Be Seen
    May 10 – Sep 8, 2024
    Remai Modern
    Saskatoon, Canada
    We may not always be aware of it, but we live in an era of continuous scrutiny. Modern technology captures, distributes, and analyzes images and data at ever-increasing rates. We are all subjects of tracking, not only by cameras employed purportedly as a deterrent for crime but also by digital tools used by corporations and governments alike to monitor and evaluate our actions, needs, and desires. (more…)
  • Miranda July: New Society
    Mar 7 – Oct 14, 2024
    Fondazione Prada
    Milan, Italy
    Curated by Mia Locks, Miranda July: New Society is the first solo museum exhibition dedicated to Miranda July’s work. Spanning three decades, from the early 1990’s until today, the exhibition includes early short films, performance, and multimedia installations. The exhibition debuts F.A.M.I.L.Y (Falling Apart Meanwhile I Love You), a multi-channel video installation July made in collaboration with seven strangers via Instagram. (more…)
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