Jergon
Art Space / Berlin

JERGON is a Berlin-based agency and art space promoting contemporary photography and groundbreaking discussions around the current state of visual arts.

Bio: Luca Santese / Main: Chochana Rosso

1 – JERGON is a crossroads of artworks and discourses on art, artists, critics, spectators, and institutions.
2 – JERGON is a wordplay and a détournement of the word Jargon, which in all Indo-European languages –and beyond– indicates a language that originates and thrives within a group. The creation of new artistic languages is indeed a fundamental component of the hub, along with the (re)placement of artworks at the center of artistic production and discourse. Ergon, in fact, is the Greek word that denotes “work” and “artwork.” The contemporary artistic landscape is saturated with proper names and tends to prioritize storytelling about authors at the expense of their creations, which inevitably take a backseat.
3 – New communities can be formed around artworks, not biographies.
4 – For this reason, JERGON aims to refocus on the artwork and benefit the viewer who can only truly engage with art itself and not just the more or less interesting biographies of the artists.
5 – JERGON does not practice a sterile and a priori critique of the art market, both public and private, but participates in it as a means to enable artists to live and enjoy their work.
6 – An artist and an intellectual should be accountable only to themselves and their commitment to art.
7 – Any social battle potentially implied by the artwork is not fruitful if the artist does not prioritize the inherent value of the artwork. As a result, any work produced for mere “activism” only harms the cause itself, creating a vicious and sterile cycle.
8 – The process of creating an artwork is free and should not be limited or judged from external moral paradigms (whether traditional, modern, or postmodern).
9 – The social value of an artwork is inseparable from its intrinsic value.
10 – JERGON supports the immanent critique of artwork, meaning that it stems from the artwork itself and not from external factors (political, biological, cultural, religious, etc.).
11 – JERGON advocates for the necessity of direct engagement with artworks, delegating the virtual realm solely for communication and promotion. The social interaction that arises around an exhibited artwork is a millennia-old characteristic of art that digital illusion jeopardizes.
12 – For this reason, JERGON proposes exhibitions, roundtable discussions, book presentations and any other initiative that brings people together, fostering dialogue, always starting from the artworks themselves, civil conflict, reflection (both solitary and collective), without fearing any possible feeling or thought that may arise from any artwork.
13 – JERGON aspires to freedom and takes a critical and radical stance against arbitrariness, ideologies, and dogmatism (both established and newly coined).
14 – JERGON promotes and encourages the highest diversity of styles, means, theoretical positions, intellectuals (as long as they are open to dialogue), and cultural references.
15 – Art is both expression and knowledge. Knowledge without aesthetic expression is theory, expression without knowledge is caprice.
16 – JERGON promotes cooperation among the different figures that constitute the art system. This does not imply the artificial suppression of conflicts but rather their transcendence and sublimation.
17 – Freedom of expression is not a lasting acquisition but rather the product of incessant debate and criticism. Dialectics erode the space for cannibalistic competition.
18 – JERGON supports cooperation even with established institutions such as museums, other galleries, university and independent research centers, without preclusions.

Jergon
Art Space / Berlin

JERGON is a Berlin-based agency and art space promoting contemporary photography and groundbreaking discussions around the current state of visual arts.

Bio: Luca Santese / Main: Chochana Rosso

1 – JERGON is a crossroads of artworks and discourses on art, artists, critics, spectators, and institutions.
2 – JERGON is a wordplay and a détournement of the word Jargon, which in all Indo-European languages –and beyond– indicates a language that originates and thrives within a group. The creation of new artistic languages is indeed a fundamental component of the hub, along with the (re)placement of artworks at the center of artistic production and discourse. Ergon, in fact, is the Greek word that denotes “work” and “artwork.” The contemporary artistic landscape is saturated with proper names and tends to prioritize storytelling about authors at the expense of their creations, which inevitably take a backseat.
3 – New communities can be formed around artworks, not biographies.
4 – For this reason, JERGON aims to refocus on the artwork and benefit the viewer who can only truly engage with art itself and not just the more or less interesting biographies of the artists.
5 – JERGON does not practice a sterile and a priori critique of the art market, both public and private, but participates in it as a means to enable artists to live and enjoy their work.
6 – An artist and an intellectual should be accountable only to themselves and their commitment to art.
7 – Any social battle potentially implied by the artwork is not fruitful if the artist does not prioritize the inherent value of the artwork. As a result, any work produced for mere “activism” only harms the cause itself, creating a vicious and sterile cycle.
8 – The process of creating an artwork is free and should not be limited or judged from external moral paradigms (whether traditional, modern, or postmodern).
9 – The social value of an artwork is inseparable from its intrinsic value.
10 – JERGON supports the immanent critique of artwork, meaning that it stems from the artwork itself and not from external factors (political, biological, cultural, religious, etc.).
11 – JERGON advocates for the necessity of direct engagement with artworks, delegating the virtual realm solely for communication and promotion. The social interaction that arises around an exhibited artwork is a millennia-old characteristic of art that digital illusion jeopardizes.
12 – For this reason, JERGON proposes exhibitions, roundtable discussions, book presentations and any other initiative that brings people together, fostering dialogue, always starting from the artworks themselves, civil conflict, reflection (both solitary and collective), without fearing any possible feeling or thought that may arise from any artwork.
13 – JERGON aspires to freedom and takes a critical and radical stance against arbitrariness, ideologies, and dogmatism (both established and newly coined).
14 – JERGON promotes and encourages the highest diversity of styles, means, theoretical positions, intellectuals (as long as they are open to dialogue), and cultural references.
15 – Art is both expression and knowledge. Knowledge without aesthetic expression is theory, expression without knowledge is caprice.
16 – JERGON promotes cooperation among the different figures that constitute the art system. This does not imply the artificial suppression of conflicts but rather their transcendence and sublimation.
17 – Freedom of expression is not a lasting acquisition but rather the product of incessant debate and criticism. Dialectics erode the space for cannibalistic competition.
18 – JERGON supports cooperation even with established institutions such as museums, other galleries, university and independent research centers, without preclusions.

  • Georg Kussmann: FRG
    Publication
    MACK
    International
    The German dramatist Heiner Müller observed that German history lies as if smothered by a rheumatism blanket: beneath there is warmth and stagnation, just enough to give the impression all is well, while the peripheries are freezing. Georg Kussmann’s photographs in FRG were created under this metaphoric blanket. Made in the Federal Republic of Germany over a single summer, they depict everyday scenes of life, work, and leisure (more…)
  • Gregory Crewdson: Retrospective
    May 29 – Sep 8, 2024
    Albertina
    Wien, Austria
    Gregory Crewdson (*1962, Brooklyn) is one of the world’s most renowned photographers. Since the mid-1980s, Crewdson has been using the backdrop of small American towns and film sets to create, like a director, technically brilliant and colourfully seductive photographs that focus on human isolation and the abysses of society. The enigmatic scenes self-reflexively raise questions about the boundary between fact and fiction but can also be related to socio-political developments. (more…)
  • Paolo Novelli. The Day After Night
    Jun 14 – Jul 21, 2024
    Camera
    Turin, Italy
    Paolo Novelli‘s (Brescia, 1976) exhibition entitled Il giorno dopo la notte (“The Day After Night”) brings together in the same space two cycles of his work made between 2011 and 2018, which are central to the evolution of his language. Both are made in analog in strict black and white, with the printing process being of paramount importance. The only subjects of the two series are windows covered by closed or bricked-up shutters on the facades of buildings without particularly attractive architectural features. (more…)
  • Miranda July: New Society
    Mar 7 – Oct 14, 2024
    Fondazione Prada
    Milan, Italy
    Curated by Mia Locks, Miranda July: New Society is the first solo museum exhibition dedicated to Miranda July’s work. Spanning three decades, from the early 1990’s until today, the exhibition includes early short films, performance, and multimedia installations. The exhibition debuts F.A.M.I.L.Y (Falling Apart Meanwhile I Love You), a multi-channel video installation July made in collaboration with seven strangers via Instagram. (more…)
  • How Not to Be Seen
    May 10 – Sep 8, 2024
    Remai Modern
    Saskatoon, Canada
    We may not always be aware of it, but we live in an era of continuous scrutiny. Modern technology captures, distributes, and analyzes images and data at ever-increasing rates. We are all subjects of tracking, not only by cameras employed purportedly as a deterrent for crime but also by digital tools used by corporations and governments alike to monitor and evaluate our actions, needs, and desires. (more…)
  • Joan Jonas: Good Night Good Morning
    Mar 17 – Jul 6, 2024
    MoMA
    New York, USA
    “I didn’t see a major difference between a poem, a sculpture, a film, or a dance,” Joan Jonas has said. For more than five decades, Jonas’s multidisciplinary work has bridged and redefined boundaries between performance, video, drawing, sculpture, and installation. The most comprehensive retrospective of the artist’s work in the United States, Joan Jonas: Good Night Good Morning traces the full breadth of her career (more…)
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