Kristen Hatgi
Photographer

A few years ago studying at the Art Institute of Boston I became aware of wet plate collodion and how it was being used by contemporary photographers such as Mark Osterman and France Scully Osterman and Sally Mann. I had no idea what it involved or where to begin. All I had heard was “it is difficult and dangerous.” Both sounded right up my ally, but still illusive. Soon after my initial interest, and by great luck, I was introduced to the process by a friend traveling through Denver, Mark Katzman. He made a few portraits of my partner Mark Sink and me. I was thereafter memorized and completely determined to make them myself. It was now real and possible. I went back to school in Boston and spent those two semesters collecting chemicals, knowledge and equipment. After graduation, Mark and I started off the summer with a huge crash course in wet plate collodion, spending all our free time shooting. Gathering chemicals, equipment, beautiful faces, bodies, flowers, and ideas. We became a team; each being the others inspiration, muse, assistant, plate coater, chemical mixer, costume designer, and lunch maker. Our hands, feet, cloths and often face were marked with silver nitrate stains. It has been my great obsession ever since.

Kristen Hatgi
Photographer

A few years ago studying at the Art Institute of Boston I became aware of wet plate collodion and how it was being used by contemporary photographers such as Mark Osterman and France Scully Osterman and Sally Mann. I had no idea what it involved or where to begin. All I had heard was “it is difficult and dangerous.” Both sounded right up my ally, but still illusive. Soon after my initial interest, and by great luck, I was introduced to the process by a friend traveling through Denver, Mark Katzman. He made a few portraits of my partner Mark Sink and me. I was thereafter memorized and completely determined to make them myself. It was now real and possible. I went back to school in Boston and spent those two semesters collecting chemicals, knowledge and equipment. After graduation, Mark and I started off the summer with a huge crash course in wet plate collodion, spending all our free time shooting. Gathering chemicals, equipment, beautiful faces, bodies, flowers, and ideas. We became a team; each being the others inspiration, muse, assistant, plate coater, chemical mixer, costume designer, and lunch maker. Our hands, feet, cloths and often face were marked with silver nitrate stains. It has been my great obsession ever since.

  • Karla Hiraldo Voleau: Another Love Story
    Publication
    Mörel
    International
    A year. That’s how long it’s been since Karla Hiraldo Voleau’s exhibition Another Love Story first opened at the MEP in Paris in 2022. A year is also the timeframe of the story chronicled in that project – a love story personal to KHV, which shifts abruptly from its climax to its end when she discovers that X, her lover, is leading a double life – a revelation that prompts the artist to question her certainties. (more…)
  • Adraint Khadafhi Bereal: The Black Yearbook
    Publication
    4 Color Books / Penguin Random House
    International
    When photographer Adraint Bereal graduated from the University of Texas, he self-published an impressive volume of portraits, personal statements, and interviews that explored UT’s campus culture and offered an intimate look at the lives of Black students matriculating within a majority white space. Bereal’s work was inspired by his first photo exhibition at the George Washington Carver Museum in Austin, entitled 1.7, that unearthed the experiences of the 925 Black men that made up just 1.7% of UT’s total 52,000 student body. (more…)
  • Grey Crawford. Chroma, 1978–85, Vol 1
    Publication
    Beam Editions
    International
    In 1978 Grey Crawford created a body of colour photographic work that was so radical in its aesthetic and technique that few people to this day understand how it was made. Chroma documents late 70s Los Angeles in a period of radical urban transformation. Scenes of vernacular architecture, demolition sites and everyday places are contrasted with graphic forms that float on the surface and sit within the image. (more…)