Photo Maxwell Tomlinson
Lubaina Himid
Artist / Curator

In her paintings, prints, drawings and installations, Lubaina Himid addresses issues of identity and celebrates black creativity and cultural contributions. Her work often focuses on the African diaspora, the legacy of slavery and institutional invisibility.

Himid’s work has been shown in recent solo shows at a number of institutions, including MRAC Languedoc Roussillon Midi-Pyrénées, Sérignan, France (2018); Harris Museum & Art Gallery, Preston, UK (2018); Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool (2018); Badischer Kunstverein, Karlsruhe, Germany (2017); Spike Island, Bristol, UK (2017); Modern Art Oxford, UK (2017) and Hospitalfield, Arbroath, UK (2016). Her work has also been presented in group exhibitions at BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead, UK (2018); Glasgow International (2018); Ferens Art Gallery, Hull, UK (2017); Seoul Museum of Art (2017); South London Gallery (2017); Nottingham Contemporary, UK (2017) and Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, the Netherlands (2016), among others.

Her work is held in public collections at institutions such as the National Museums Liverpool; Tate; Victoria & Albert Museum, London; Museum Ludwig, Cologne, Germany; British Council Collection; Arts Council Collection; UK Government Art Collection; Birmingham Museums, UK; Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, US; Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art, UK and Wolverhampton Museum, UK.

She is the winner of the Turner Prize 2017 and was appointed MBE in 2010 for services to black women’s art.

Himid is professor of contemporary art at the University of Central Lancashire, UK, where she oversees the Making Histories Visible archive and collection. She studied theatre design at Wimbledon College of Arts, UK and received an MA in Cultural History from the Royal College of Art, London.

Born in 1954 in Zanzibar, Himid currently lives and works in Preston, UK.

[Sharjah Art Foundation]

Lubaina Himid
Artist / Curator

In her paintings, prints, drawings and installations, Lubaina Himid addresses issues of identity and celebrates black creativity and cultural contributions. Her work often focuses on the African diaspora, the legacy of slavery and institutional invisibility.

Himid’s work has been shown in recent solo shows at a number of institutions, including MRAC Languedoc Roussillon Midi-Pyrénées, Sérignan, France (2018); Harris Museum & Art Gallery, Preston, UK (2018); Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool (2018); Badischer Kunstverein, Karlsruhe, Germany (2017); Spike Island, Bristol, UK (2017); Modern Art Oxford, UK (2017) and Hospitalfield, Arbroath, UK (2016). Her work has also been presented in group exhibitions at BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead, UK (2018); Glasgow International (2018); Ferens Art Gallery, Hull, UK (2017); Seoul Museum of Art (2017); South London Gallery (2017); Nottingham Contemporary, UK (2017) and Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, the Netherlands (2016), among others.

Her work is held in public collections at institutions such as the National Museums Liverpool; Tate; Victoria & Albert Museum, London; Museum Ludwig, Cologne, Germany; British Council Collection; Arts Council Collection; UK Government Art Collection; Birmingham Museums, UK; Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, US; Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art, UK and Wolverhampton Museum, UK.

She is the winner of the Turner Prize 2017 and was appointed MBE in 2010 for services to black women’s art.

Himid is professor of contemporary art at the University of Central Lancashire, UK, where she oversees the Making Histories Visible archive and collection. She studied theatre design at Wimbledon College of Arts, UK and received an MA in Cultural History from the Royal College of Art, London.

Born in 1954 in Zanzibar, Himid currently lives and works in Preston, UK.

[Sharjah Art Foundation]

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