Meg Vogel
Photographer

I currently work as a visual journalist for my hometown paper, The Cincinnati Enquirer in Ohio.

I am a graduate of Ohio University’s School of Visual Communication. During my college career, I interned at The Cincinnati Enquirer, The Post-Crescent in Appleton, Wisconsin and National Public Radio in Washington D.C. After graduating, I sought every available opportunity to see the world. I led 30 teenagers through Masaai markets on slaughter day, taught photography classes in the colorful markets of Jodhpur and built water tanks in the shadow of Kilimanjaro. I returned to Ohio to explore the 52 neighborhoods of my hometown.

I want to understand people. How they think, feel and move through the world. Each experience whether in my backyard or thousands of miles away has taught me something about humanity. I am honored every day that people trust me and open their lives to me. Each story I have worked on has shaped me as a photographer and human. Over the past three years, I have focused on stories about the transgender community, Syrian refugees, sexual assault on college campuses and the heroin epidemic.

My work has been recognized by organizations, like World Press Photo, National Press Photographers Association, Ohio Valley Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, Ohio News Photographer Association and Associated Press. I also participated in the Eddie Adams Workshop in Jeffersonville, New York in 2015.

Meg Vogel
Photographer

I currently work as a visual journalist for my hometown paper, The Cincinnati Enquirer in Ohio.

I am a graduate of Ohio University’s School of Visual Communication. During my college career, I interned at The Cincinnati Enquirer, The Post-Crescent in Appleton, Wisconsin and National Public Radio in Washington D.C. After graduating, I sought every available opportunity to see the world. I led 30 teenagers through Masaai markets on slaughter day, taught photography classes in the colorful markets of Jodhpur and built water tanks in the shadow of Kilimanjaro. I returned to Ohio to explore the 52 neighborhoods of my hometown.

I want to understand people. How they think, feel and move through the world. Each experience whether in my backyard or thousands of miles away has taught me something about humanity. I am honored every day that people trust me and open their lives to me. Each story I have worked on has shaped me as a photographer and human. Over the past three years, I have focused on stories about the transgender community, Syrian refugees, sexual assault on college campuses and the heroin epidemic.

My work has been recognized by organizations, like World Press Photo, National Press Photographers Association, Ohio Valley Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, Ohio News Photographer Association and Associated Press. I also participated in the Eddie Adams Workshop in Jeffersonville, New York in 2015.

  • Re-Stor(y)ing Oceania
    Mar 23 – Oct 13, 2024
    Ocean Space
    Venice, Italy
    TBA21–Academy announces Re-Stor(y)ing Oceania, a new exhibition comprising two new site-specific commissions by Indigenous practitioners from the Pacific, Latai Taumoepeau and Elisapeta Hinemoa Heta. The exhibition is curated by Bougainville-born artist Taloi Havini, returning to Ocean Space after her 2021 solo exhibition. Re-Stor(y)ing Oceania platforms artists and communities who live and work in the vast and diverse region of islands and atolls (more…)
  • Mary Heilmann / Daydream Nation
    May 2 – Jul 26, 2024
    Hauser & Wirth
    New York, USA
    “A body of work starts by daydreaming…” –Mary Heilmann On May 2nd, we will open ‘Daydream Nation’ at its 22nd Street gallery, exploring Mary Heilmann’s ongoing interest in drawing as a form of transcribing memory. Curated by artist Gary Simmons, Heilmann’s friend and former student and colleague at New York’s School of Visual Arts, the exhibition celebrates her talent for distilling complex images and ideas into deceptively simple geometric forms and abstract gestural marks. (more…)
  • Maria Sturm: You Don’t Look Native to Me
    Publication
    Void
    International
    In 2011, Maria Sturm began to photograph the lives of young people from the Lumbee Tribe around Pembroke, Robeson County, North Carolina. Through the process of documenting their lives, Sturm began to question her own understanding of what it means to be Native American. Her new book You Don’t Look Native to Me combines photographs with interviews and texts to preconceptions and show Native identity not as fixed, but evolving and redefining itself with each generation. (more…)
  • Michela de Mattei & Toby Christian: Flash_Looking
    May 17 – Jul 5, 2024
    Belmacz
    London, UK
    The phrase ‘flash-looking’ suggests something slick and shiny, a high-gloss finish, a smooth way of operating. As a synchronising of parts, the phrase also suggests a quick glance, a glimpse, something seen out of the of corner of one’s eye: “What’s that”. Flash_Looking, featuring Toby Christian and Michela de Mattei, works through these connotations and more. Brought in dialogue, Toby and Michela’s artworks speak with and across each other with an anachronistic elegance (more…)