ARTPIL Profiles of the Arts
Andrzej Wróblewski
Through April 14, 2018 / David Zwirner

Andrzej Wróblewski / Mother with Dead Child, 1949

David Zwirner Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition of work by Polish artist Andrzej Wróblewski (1927–1957) at the gallery’s 24 Grafton Street location in London. This is the first solo presentation of his work in the United Kingdom.

Now considered a leading figure in postwar Polish art, Wróblewski’s short but prolific career encompassed painting, works on paper, and prints. Often drawing from Poland’s sociopolitical atmosphere in the wake of the Second World War, Wróblewski’s singular practice is characterized by a unique blend of figuration and abstraction. On view is a group of key paintings and a wide-ranging selection of works on paper detailing recurring subjects throughout the artist’s oeuvre.

 

Andrzej Wróblewski / Chauffer, 1956

Andrzej Wróblewski / Blue Chauffeur, 1948

In 1948, at the age of twenty-one, Wróblewski started his Chauffeur series, a body of work characterized by its sparse use of color and the presence of an anonymous driver, his back turned to the viewer. Blue Chauffeur (1948), the first painting in this series, is made up of three distinct fields of color that order the composition: white, red, and blue—the latter of which was frequently used by Wróblewski to denote death. Throughout his career, Wróblewski completed many double-sided works, a method he deliberately applied to paintings and works on paper. Conceived as two parts of a larger whole, these works typically deal with opposing subjects that complicate and advance the meaning of the work on either side, a strategy that allowed Wróblewski to convey multiple narrative and stylistic possibilities. On the opposite side of this painting, Wróblewski executed Liquidation of the Ghetto (1948), a contrasting image densely populated with figures in signature hues of blue. Both made in the same year that Wróblewski cofounded the Self-Educational Group, a student organization created in response to growing dissatisfaction with the Academy, these paintings mark a shift in his subject matter toward the individual and his psychic life.

 

Andrzej Wróblewski / Uprising of the Ghetto, 1948

Andrzej Wróblewski / Execution VIII, 1949

Wróblewski began his seminal Execution series one year later. In a number of works from this series, Wróblewski has narrowed in on people lined up against a wall in the moments directly before or after their execution by the Nazis. In a related drawing entitled Sketch for Executions no. 1499 (n.d.), four plainly dressed figures stand shoulder to shoulder, their bodies delimited by the borders of the page. One figure is suspended in front of them upside down, his orientation in sharp contrast to the others in line. Wróblewski often created distinct visual markers such as this configuration to illustrate a subject’s imminent fate and ultimate dehumanization.

In a departure from this format, Mother with Dead Child (1949)—an additional painting from this series and among his best-known works—addresses the subject of execution in more intimate terms. In this work, an infant clutches his mother in a somber embrace. Wróblewski has used blue once again, this time to mark the difference between a person of this world and one who has recently departed from it.

 

Andrzej Wróblewski / Group Scene no.238

Andrzej Wróblewski / Abstract Composition in Green

The later part of Wróblewski’s oeuvre is marked by an intense period of production on paper, an essential medium for the artist. Here he documented a number of subjects including cityscapes, geometric abstractions, and landscapes from his travels. But perhaps his most significant works on paper were his studies of the human figure, sensitively rendered in fields of empty space. When facial features are articulated, the subject’s gaze is often averted, hinting at impatience or absence. As art historian Noit Banai has noted, “In this extraordinarily precarious and plural historical moment, between the war’s end and the advent of Socialist Realism as official cultural policy, Andrzej Wróblewski developed a language of radical corporality in which a subject’s vulnerability to divergent relations of power was given tactile form.”

 

Andrzej Wróblewski / Self portrait

Andrzej Wróblewski, Head of a Girl / Profile no.1011

Wróblewski’s innovative approach to figuration—sometimes fusing human anatomy with geometric shapes, or foregrounding the figure in isolation—posited the body as a real and complicated subject, while also addressing the limits of its representation. The novel strategies he employed in the 1940s and 1950s would influence a younger generation of artists in Poland and abroad, including Luc Tuymans, who has commented on Wróblewski’s and his own shared use of “the empty space, the void.” In 2010, Tuymans included Wróblewski’s work in The Reality of the Lowest Rank: A Vision of Central Europe, a group exhibition he curated at the concert hall and other venues in Bruges. Their work, along with that of René Daniëls, was also the subject of a three-person exhibition at Art Stations Foundation, Poznań (2014; traveled to Drawing Room, London), attesting to Wróblewski’s continued relevance to contemporary art.

 

Andrzej Wróblewski
Through April 14, 2018 / David Zwirner Gallery
For more information please visit the exhibition page >

Recent Articles
Futures Past & Present
Mar 9 - Jun 2, 2019 / Huis Marseille
The photographers Céline van Balen, Julie Greve, Esther Kroon and Helga Paris…
The photographers Céline van Balen, Julie Greve, Esther Kroon and Helga Paris are linked by their exceptional ability…
A Résumé / Ernst Caramelle
Through April 28, 2019 / mumok
The first comprehensive retrospective of the Austrian artist Ernst Caramelle includes all…
The first comprehensive retrospective of the Austrian artist Ernst Caramelle includes all of his phases from 1974 to…
ARTPIL / Prescription .088
Feels like a million bucks
Tragedy at Christchurch mosques in New Zealand, Brexit extension requested, Kazakhstan’s Nazarbayev…
Tragedy at Christchurch mosques in New Zealand, Brexit extension requested, Kazakhstan’s Nazarbayev resigns, 5 year anniversary of annexed…
The Other Art Fair
Presented by Saatchi Art
Celebrated for its unique and immersive visitor experience, The Other Art Fair…
Celebrated for its unique and immersive visitor experience, The Other Art Fair has grown both in the UK…
CITTADIMILANO / Giorgio Andreotta Calò
Feb 14 - Jul 21, 2019 / Pirelli HangarBicocca
Among the contexts evoked, the city of Milan provides one of the…
Among the contexts evoked, the city of Milan provides one of the central premises of the exhibition which…
Valparaíso
Photography by Eleonore Simon
In a culture where improvisation has become an art form, Valparaíso’s charm…
In a culture where improvisation has become an art form, Valparaíso’s charm and grittiness instantly captured my imagination…
First Lingering Mist of Spring
Feb 23 - Mar 24, 2019 / TOKAS
The artists in this exhibition harness photography, film and painting to explore…
The artists in this exhibition harness photography, film and painting to explore Japan’s changing seasons and landscapes. Transformations…
Plans for an Unused Land / Anna-Bella Papp
Through Apr 13, 2019 / Modern Art
Speculating on the potential uses of land, the series becomes personal musings…
Speculating on the potential uses of land, the series becomes personal musings on not only legacy and time,…
Andrzej Wróblewski
Through April 14, 2018 / David Zwirner

Andrzej Wróblewski / Mother with Dead Child, 1949

David Zwirner Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition of work by Polish artist Andrzej Wróblewski (1927–1957) at the gallery’s 24 Grafton Street location in London. This is the first solo presentation of his work in the United Kingdom.

Now considered a leading figure in postwar Polish art, Wróblewski’s short but prolific career encompassed painting, works on paper, and prints. Often drawing from Poland’s sociopolitical atmosphere in the wake of the Second World War, Wróblewski’s singular practice is characterized by a unique blend of figuration and abstraction. On view is a group of key paintings and a wide-ranging selection of works on paper detailing recurring subjects throughout the artist’s oeuvre.

 

Andrzej Wróblewski / Chauffer, 1956

Andrzej Wróblewski / Blue Chauffeur, 1948

In 1948, at the age of twenty-one, Wróblewski started his Chauffeur series, a body of work characterized by its sparse use of color and the presence of an anonymous driver, his back turned to the viewer. Blue Chauffeur (1948), the first painting in this series, is made up of three distinct fields of color that order the composition: white, red, and blue—the latter of which was frequently used by Wróblewski to denote death. Throughout his career, Wróblewski completed many double-sided works, a method he deliberately applied to paintings and works on paper. Conceived as two parts of a larger whole, these works typically deal with opposing subjects that complicate and advance the meaning of the work on either side, a strategy that allowed Wróblewski to convey multiple narrative and stylistic possibilities. On the opposite side of this painting, Wróblewski executed Liquidation of the Ghetto (1948), a contrasting image densely populated with figures in signature hues of blue. Both made in the same year that Wróblewski cofounded the Self-Educational Group, a student organization created in response to growing dissatisfaction with the Academy, these paintings mark a shift in his subject matter toward the individual and his psychic life.

 

Andrzej Wróblewski / Uprising of the Ghetto, 1948

Andrzej Wróblewski / Execution VIII, 1949

Wróblewski began his seminal Execution series one year later. In a number of works from this series, Wróblewski has narrowed in on people lined up against a wall in the moments directly before or after their execution by the Nazis. In a related drawing entitled Sketch for Executions no. 1499 (n.d.), four plainly dressed figures stand shoulder to shoulder, their bodies delimited by the borders of the page. One figure is suspended in front of them upside down, his orientation in sharp contrast to the others in line. Wróblewski often created distinct visual markers such as this configuration to illustrate a subject’s imminent fate and ultimate dehumanization.

In a departure from this format, Mother with Dead Child (1949)—an additional painting from this series and among his best-known works—addresses the subject of execution in more intimate terms. In this work, an infant clutches his mother in a somber embrace. Wróblewski has used blue once again, this time to mark the difference between a person of this world and one who has recently departed from it.

 

Andrzej Wróblewski / Group Scene no.238

Andrzej Wróblewski / Abstract Composition in Green

The later part of Wróblewski’s oeuvre is marked by an intense period of production on paper, an essential medium for the artist. Here he documented a number of subjects including cityscapes, geometric abstractions, and landscapes from his travels. But perhaps his most significant works on paper were his studies of the human figure, sensitively rendered in fields of empty space. When facial features are articulated, the subject’s gaze is often averted, hinting at impatience or absence. As art historian Noit Banai has noted, “In this extraordinarily precarious and plural historical moment, between the war’s end and the advent of Socialist Realism as official cultural policy, Andrzej Wróblewski developed a language of radical corporality in which a subject’s vulnerability to divergent relations of power was given tactile form.”

 

Andrzej Wróblewski / Self portrait

Andrzej Wróblewski, Head of a Girl / Profile no.1011

Wróblewski’s innovative approach to figuration—sometimes fusing human anatomy with geometric shapes, or foregrounding the figure in isolation—posited the body as a real and complicated subject, while also addressing the limits of its representation. The novel strategies he employed in the 1940s and 1950s would influence a younger generation of artists in Poland and abroad, including Luc Tuymans, who has commented on Wróblewski’s and his own shared use of “the empty space, the void.” In 2010, Tuymans included Wróblewski’s work in The Reality of the Lowest Rank: A Vision of Central Europe, a group exhibition he curated at the concert hall and other venues in Bruges. Their work, along with that of René Daniëls, was also the subject of a three-person exhibition at Art Stations Foundation, Poznań (2014; traveled to Drawing Room, London), attesting to Wróblewski’s continued relevance to contemporary art.

 

Andrzej Wróblewski
Through April 14, 2018 / David Zwirner Gallery
For more information please visit the exhibition page >