ARTPIL Profiles of the Arts
Darkest Hour / Thomas Ralph
Britain No Exit

Darkest Hour / Thomas Ralph
In the recluse of
rivers by a bend

Where a tree leans in
to the water’s bank

A fire will ascend.
You saw the raven

Perched on its nest of
pomp. A broken bough

Against the wind, and
against everything.

So instruct the light
in what respite, the

Significant sigh,
the causality

In each caustic cry,
cleaved by consequence.

Twice and twice the red
crocodile will wield

New wisdom expelled
of its appetite.

You will shake the rose
of its steel petals.

A finger will then
untwist this season

Out of the wind, so
out of everything.

–from I, Faust

 

Yesterday, Britain voted on Brexit. With less than three months before it was scheduled to leave the European Union, the British House of Commons rejected the painstaking deal Theresa May negotiated with the European Parliament. Everyone saw this coming. Even the European Parliament knew it wasn’t a deal worth accepting. No one would have guessed it was going to be the border to the north cutting Ireland which was to present the greatest challenge.

This little pearl of stylish and emotive documentary filmmaking, Darkest Hour, Directed by Thomas Ralph, and produced just after the initial referendum over two years ago before the laborious path in which Brexit would embark only to be ultimately defeated, resonates today, more than ever.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s never felt quite as isolating to live on these Great British Isles as it does in the wake of the referendum. That feeling of isolation to which I refer to isn’t defined by our unknown relationship to Europe, but rather by an insidious isolationism which has seen the diverse communities of the UK withdraw into themselves with definitions clearly drawn between ‘them’ and ‘us.’ All too cognizant of the tumultuous mood of the country, Thomas Ralph decided to canvas the largely unheard views of the generation who had no say in the vote, yet will undoubtedly be the most affected, in his forthright documentary Darkest Hour.

– MarBelle / Directors Notes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thomas Ralph / Darkest Hour (stills)

Thomas Ralph describes, “This film seeks to portray, listen and understand the generation to be most affected and for whom the situation was decided without them, the British youth.”

 

Darkest Hour / Directed by Thomas Ralph
Winner, Homespun Yarns 2016.
Producer, Nadira Amrani / Executive Producer, Ore Okonedo
Cinematographer, Joseph Alexander Guy
Music, Lyves, “Darkest Hour”

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Darkest Hour / Thomas Ralph
Britain No Exit

Darkest Hour / Thomas Ralph
In the recluse of
rivers by a bend

Where a tree leans in
to the water’s bank

A fire will ascend.
You saw the raven

Perched on its nest of
pomp. A broken bough

Against the wind, and
against everything.

So instruct the light
in what respite, the

Significant sigh,
the causality

In each caustic cry,
cleaved by consequence.

Twice and twice the red
crocodile will wield

New wisdom expelled
of its appetite.

You will shake the rose
of its steel petals.

A finger will then
untwist this season

Out of the wind, so
out of everything.

–from I, Faust

 

Yesterday, Britain voted on Brexit. With less than three months before it was scheduled to leave the European Union, the British House of Commons rejected the painstaking deal Theresa May negotiated with the European Parliament. Everyone saw this coming. Even the European Parliament knew it wasn’t a deal worth accepting. No one would have guessed it was going to be the border to the north cutting Ireland which was to present the greatest challenge.

This little pearl of stylish and emotive documentary filmmaking, Darkest Hour, Directed by Thomas Ralph, and produced just after the initial referendum over two years ago before the laborious path in which Brexit would embark only to be ultimately defeated, resonates today, more than ever.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s never felt quite as isolating to live on these Great British Isles as it does in the wake of the referendum. That feeling of isolation to which I refer to isn’t defined by our unknown relationship to Europe, but rather by an insidious isolationism which has seen the diverse communities of the UK withdraw into themselves with definitions clearly drawn between ‘them’ and ‘us.’ All too cognizant of the tumultuous mood of the country, Thomas Ralph decided to canvas the largely unheard views of the generation who had no say in the vote, yet will undoubtedly be the most affected, in his forthright documentary Darkest Hour.

– MarBelle / Directors Notes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thomas Ralph / Darkest Hour (stills)

Thomas Ralph describes, “This film seeks to portray, listen and understand the generation to be most affected and for whom the situation was decided without them, the British youth.”

 

Darkest Hour / Directed by Thomas Ralph
Winner, Homespun Yarns 2016.
Producer, Nadira Amrani / Executive Producer, Ore Okonedo
Cinematographer, Joseph Alexander Guy
Music, Lyves, “Darkest Hour”