ARTPIL Profiles of the Arts
Framing Time
Through February 9, 2019

Robbert Flick / SV 023B North of Kankakee, Illinois, 1980, SV 009 Venice Beach 180 degrees, 1980, SV 014 Manhattan Beach from Vista, 1980, SV003/80, 1980

DENK gallery is pleased to present Framing Time, a group exhibition featuring photography-based works by ten contemporary artists with formative or working connections to Los Angeles. Each artist approaches the concept of temporality with unique and evocative applications of a medium that inherently lends itself to the capture of time. With projects ranging from the poetic and conceptual to the obsessively documentary, Framing Time presents investigations of its passing and ephemera from its arrest. In place of the static snapshot, or frozen ‘Kodak moment’ – an idea popularized by the company’s iconic 60’s ad campaign – these artists offer complex and layered sequences of photographic imagery, redistributing the visual narrative of the medium somewhere between the cinematic and the experiential.

 

Dinh Q Lê / View From Above (Double Standing Portrait), 2017

Augusta Wood / HF, JM, RL, Posy (1983, 1985, 1996, 2002, 2008), 2010

Augusta Wood / Mostra Di, Helen holding a carton of milk (1993, 1994, 1999, 2003, 2003, 2008), 2011

Framing Time features critical works by Uta Barth, Stephen Berens, John Divola, Robbert Flick, Tim Hawkinson, Dinh Q Lê, George Legrady, Sharon Lockhart, Ed Ruscha, and Augusta Wood, all of whom have pushed the boundaries of photography in experimental ways. Shared among the examples from this group of artists is an interest in the medium’s living dimensions, and its potential, to capture movement, subtle shifts in environment, incremental changes in observed or staged subjects, and even its sculptural or plastic possibilities through process-oriented interventions.

 

George Legrady / Coliseum, 2015

Uta Barth / Deep Blue Day (12.5), 2012

John Divola, R01F30, 1996 – 1997 / R01F07, 1996 – 1997

Stephen Berens, Through thick fog and mist & The air was so dusty, 2017 / Gentle winds & The moon, watery and pale is up, 2018

Whether in pursuit of the primary moment, a lost history, a collective view, or an impression of time and place, these works are similarly in search of the physical traces of dead, transient time. This essential haunting, long the indisputable domain of photography, remains as poignant as ever, especially in an age of digital dissimulation and increasing disembodiment. A medium of longing and evasion, it’s shadowy dimensions are fugitively caught, offering us the vague evidence of our own mortality.

 

Framing Time
Through February 9, 2019 / Denk Gallery
Visit the exhibition page >

Recent Articles
In the Land of Drought
Julian Rosefeldt
Confronting the relationship between humanity and its impact on the world, the…
Confronting the relationship between humanity and its impact on the world, the camera follows an army of scientists…
Eating Flowers
Sensations of Cig Harvey
Spanning photography, video, mixed media and the written word, Harvey’s creative practice…
Spanning photography, video, mixed media and the written word, Harvey’s creative practice explores physical and emotional boundaries of…
ARTPIL / Prescription .099
The deep immortal human wish
Deep immortal human wish, the timeless will. Voyage through death to life…
Deep immortal human wish, the timeless will. Voyage through death to life upon these shores. Shuttles in the…
Erwin Olaf: Women
Through August 16, 2019
Olaf’s women subjects are staged in highly composed images of formal perfection…
Olaf’s women subjects are staged in highly composed images of formal perfection while instilling a sense of quiet…
All Bodies Are Temples
Slowroom Contemporary
In conversation with photographer and curator Pete Lamberto and graphic designer Casper…
In conversation with photographer and curator Pete Lamberto and graphic designer Casper Svendsen of the nomadic platform Slowroom…
Preston Bus Station / Jamie Hawkesworth
Through August 31, 2019
I began to see, feel and understand its effect, I was becoming…
I began to see, feel and understand its effect, I was becoming sensitive to light. Being patient in…
So British! Collection Pinault
Through May 11, 2020
Since its creation 30 years ago, the Pinault collection has grown quickly…
Since its creation 30 years ago, the Pinault collection has grown quickly to become a major presence in…
Languages of Dissent
Stephen Willats / to August 18, 2019
Exploring the modular architecture of social housing projects, Stephen Willats spotlights forms…
Exploring the modular architecture of social housing projects, Stephen Willats spotlights forms of individual creative adaptation that defy…
Framing Time
Through February 9, 2019

Robbert Flick / SV 023B North of Kankakee, Illinois, 1980, SV 009 Venice Beach 180 degrees, 1980, SV 014 Manhattan Beach from Vista, 1980, SV003/80, 1980

DENK gallery is pleased to present Framing Time, a group exhibition featuring photography-based works by ten contemporary artists with formative or working connections to Los Angeles. Each artist approaches the concept of temporality with unique and evocative applications of a medium that inherently lends itself to the capture of time. With projects ranging from the poetic and conceptual to the obsessively documentary, Framing Time presents investigations of its passing and ephemera from its arrest. In place of the static snapshot, or frozen ‘Kodak moment’ – an idea popularized by the company’s iconic 60’s ad campaign – these artists offer complex and layered sequences of photographic imagery, redistributing the visual narrative of the medium somewhere between the cinematic and the experiential.

 

Dinh Q Lê / View From Above (Double Standing Portrait), 2017

Augusta Wood / HF, JM, RL, Posy (1983, 1985, 1996, 2002, 2008), 2010

Augusta Wood / Mostra Di, Helen holding a carton of milk (1993, 1994, 1999, 2003, 2003, 2008), 2011

Framing Time features critical works by Uta Barth, Stephen Berens, John Divola, Robbert Flick, Tim Hawkinson, Dinh Q Lê, George Legrady, Sharon Lockhart, Ed Ruscha, and Augusta Wood, all of whom have pushed the boundaries of photography in experimental ways. Shared among the examples from this group of artists is an interest in the medium’s living dimensions, and its potential, to capture movement, subtle shifts in environment, incremental changes in observed or staged subjects, and even its sculptural or plastic possibilities through process-oriented interventions.

 

George Legrady / Coliseum, 2015

Uta Barth / Deep Blue Day (12.5), 2012

John Divola, R01F30, 1996 – 1997 / R01F07, 1996 – 1997

Stephen Berens, Through thick fog and mist & The air was so dusty, 2017 / Gentle winds & The moon, watery and pale is up, 2018

Whether in pursuit of the primary moment, a lost history, a collective view, or an impression of time and place, these works are similarly in search of the physical traces of dead, transient time. This essential haunting, long the indisputable domain of photography, remains as poignant as ever, especially in an age of digital dissimulation and increasing disembodiment. A medium of longing and evasion, it’s shadowy dimensions are fugitively caught, offering us the vague evidence of our own mortality.

 

Framing Time
Through February 9, 2019 / Denk Gallery
Visit the exhibition page >