Let Me Consider It from Here
Nov 17, 2018 – Jan 27, 2019

Saul Fletcher, Untitled # 23 (self/behind desk), 1997 (detail). Courtesy of the artist and Anton Kern Gallery

Gritty faces look out from painted cages, surrounded by wax flowers, string, and various mutated forms. Photographs capture a studio wall marked by cryptic arrangements. A woman’s voice, floating in the space, relates her restless nighttime walks. Plush domestic rugs become the substrate for paintings of warped boots and menacing dogs.

Let Me Consider It from Here at The Renaissance Society presents four artists Constance DeJong, Saul Fletcher, Brook Hsu, and Tetsumi Kudo, who operate in the liminal realms between the public and the intimate, the concrete and the fantastical. They frequently draw from their own histories, humors, and instincts as they grapple with or reimagine what’s happening in the world around them. Across a range of media, their works open up spaces that oscillate between strange and familiar, registering deeply personal experiences as well as more ambient cultural and political pressures.

 

Saul Fletcher, Untitled #264 (8 Nests), 2013. Courtesy Of The Artist And Anton Kern Gallery

Saul Fletcher, Untitled #290 (skeleton ft. Petrus Christus) (detail), 2014. Courtesy of the artist and Anton Kern Gallery, New York

How does an artist process the circumstances of their time in relation to their own milieu and psyche? The works in this exhibition are borne of different moments and places, whether 1970s Japan, in the case of Kudo; Europe around the early 2000s for Fletcher; and, for Hsu and DeJong, the present-day United States. Brought together here, in a period in which public life feels defined both by digital interconnection and vocal conflict on many fronts, their practices suggest other ways of meeting the world face to face: anchored in solitary places but stretching beyond, and drawing on a generative tension between inside and out.

 

Brook Hsu, Forget-Me-Not, 2016. Courtesy Of The Artist And Deli Gallery, New York

Brook Hsu, Earth Angel, 2017. Courtesy Of The Artist And Deli Gallery, New York

In tandem with the gallery presentation, poets Geoffrey G. O’Brien, Simone White, and Lynn Xu have been invited to write new texts, which will be presented in a public reading and in the forthcoming catalogue. These writers evince a shared positioning with the artists in Let me consider it from here, parsing in their own ways the complexities of contemporary experience from within a more private sphere.

 

Constance Dejong and Tony Oursler, Relatives, 1988, Performance View At The Kitchen, New York, 2018

Let Me Consider It from Here is supported by the David C. & Sarajean Ruttenberg Arts Foundation, the Curator’s Circle of the Renaissance Society, and the Japan Foundation, New York.

 

Let Me Consider It from Here
Constance DeJong, Saul Fletcher, Brook Hsu, Tetsumi Kudo
Curated by Solveig Øvstebø
November 17, 2018 – January 27, 2019 / The Renaissance Society
Please visit the exhibition page >

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