ARTPIL Profiles of the Arts
Rachel Whiteread at Tate Britain
Opens Today, September 12, 2017

Celebrating over 25 years of Rachel Whiteread’s internationally acclaimed work, this momentous show at Tate Britain brings together both the famous sculptures alongside new pieces never previously exhibited.

One of Britain’s leading contemporary artists, Whiteread uses industrial materials such as plaster, concrete, resin, rubber and metal to cast everyday objects and architectural space. Her evocative sculptures range from the intimate to the monumental.

 

 

 

Born in London in 1963, Whiteread was the first woman to win the Turner Prize in 1993. The same year she made House 1993–1994, a life-sized cast of the interior of a condemned terraced house in London’s East End, which existed for a few months before it was controversially demolished.

She takes empty interiors and gives them presence and heft. She gives the inside of things a life we never knew they possessed. –The Independent

 

 

 

On the lawn outside Tate Britain a new concrete sculpture, Chicken Shed 2017, will sit during the exhibition.

On view at Tate Britain
September 12, 2017 – January 21, 2018
Visit the exhibition page >

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Rachel Whiteread at Tate Britain
Opens Today, September 12, 2017

Celebrating over 25 years of Rachel Whiteread’s internationally acclaimed work, this momentous show at Tate Britain brings together both the famous sculptures alongside new pieces never previously exhibited.

One of Britain’s leading contemporary artists, Whiteread uses industrial materials such as plaster, concrete, resin, rubber and metal to cast everyday objects and architectural space. Her evocative sculptures range from the intimate to the monumental.

 

 

 

Born in London in 1963, Whiteread was the first woman to win the Turner Prize in 1993. The same year she made House 1993–1994, a life-sized cast of the interior of a condemned terraced house in London’s East End, which existed for a few months before it was controversially demolished.

She takes empty interiors and gives them presence and heft. She gives the inside of things a life we never knew they possessed. –The Independent

 

 

 

On the lawn outside Tate Britain a new concrete sculpture, Chicken Shed 2017, will sit during the exhibition.

On view at Tate Britain
September 12, 2017 – January 21, 2018
Visit the exhibition page >