Vivian Maier: The Color Work
Nov 14, 2018 – Mar 2, 2019

Vivian Maier / Untitled, n.d.

The color work of street photographer Vivian Maier will be the subject of a new exhibition at Howard Greenberg Gallery through January 5, 2019. Many of the photographs are on view for the first time, deepening the understanding of Maier’s oeuvre and her keenness to record and present her interpretation of the world around her. Dating from the 1950s to the 1980s, Vivian Maier: The Color Work captures the street life of Chicago and New York, and includes a number of her enigmatic self-portraits.

 

Vivian Maier / Untitled, 1960

Vivian Maier / Chicago, 1978

Vivian Maier / Chicago, April 1977

Vivian Maier / Self-portrait, Chicago area, June 1975

Vivian Maier / Chicago, 1979

Vivian Maier / New York City, 1959

The exhibition coincides with the publication of Vivian Maier: The Color Work (Harper Design | HarperCollins, November 2018) the first book devoted to her color images. With a foreword by renowned photographer Joel Meyerowitz and text by Colin Westerbeck, a former curator of photography at the Art Institute of Chicago, the book was created in partnership with Howard Greenberg Gallery.

 

Vivian Maier / Chicago, February 1976

Vivian Maier, Untitled, n.d. / Chicago, n.d.

Vivian Maier / Chicago, October 1976

“Maier was an early poet of color photography,” writes Joel Meyerowitz in the foreword to the book. “You can see in her photographs that she was a quick study of human behavior, of the unfolding moment, the flash of a gesture, or the mood of a facial expression – brief events that turned the quotidian life of the street into a revelation for her.”

Since 2010, Maier’s photographs have been exhibited in museums and galleries worldwide. The 2013 documentary film, Finding Vivian Maier, co-directed by historian John Maloof (who discovered her work at an auction in Chicago in 2007), was nominated for an Academy Award.

 

Vivian Maier / Self-portrait, Chicago area, October 1975

Vivian Maier, Untitled, n.d.  / Untitled, 1972

Vivian Maier / Self-portrait, Chicago, June 1976

Vivian Maier (1926–2009) was born in New York City, spent much of her youth in France, worked for 40 years as a nanny mostly in Chicago, and photographed consistently over five decades. When she died, Maier left behind more than 150,000 photographic images – prints, negatives, transparencies, and rolls of undeveloped film – though few had ever heard about or seen her work. Maier’s color work was made during her last 30 years. After retiring her signature Rolleiflex, she began working with a 35-millimeter camera and produced roughly 40,000 Ektachrome color slides.

“Maier was a self-invented polymath of a photographer,” writes Colin Westerbeck in the book. “The one advantage Maier gained from keeping her photography to herself was an exemption from contradiction and condescension. She didn’t have to worry about either the orthodoxy or the approval of her peers.”

 

Vivian Maier: The Color Work
November 14, 2018 – March 2, 2019 / Howard Greenberg Gallery
Please visit the exhibition page >

Towards No Earthly Pole / Julian Charrière
January 31 – March 21, 2020
Filmed at night, the dazzling landscapes captured are dramatically lit by a spotlight carried on a drone; as light...
+
Katy Moran / Recent Paintings
Jan 11 – Feb 19, 2020
Recently described as an ​“abstract painter of figurative mood,” Moran enlists a wide scope of mark-making to conjure different...
+
Joanna Piotrowska
January 24 – March 7, 2020
The tension is triggered by the reversibility of the situations, gestures and actions staged, the suspended moment of an...
+
Botanical Drift / Ebbe Stub Wittrup
January 23 – May 17, 2020
As Ebbe Stub Wittrup follows in the footsteps of the Danish botanist Nathaniel Wallich, a narrative emerges on Western...
+
ARTPIL / Prescription .109
Civilization and its Discontent
A State of emergency is declared in Canberra, Australia. The Novel coronavirus continues to spread. The Impeachment hearings in...
+
Southern Rites / Gillian Laub
Various engagements / 2020
This small town symbolized the archetype of pastoral American life. Yet this idyllic place was also held hostage by...
+
Reading Time in Space
Modernism at mumok
This exhibit traces passages of time and artistic concepts, accounting the idea of an expanded concept of art, one...
+
International Film Festival Rotterdam 2020
Jan 22 – Feb 2, 2020
One of the largest film festivals in the world, the IFFR presents over 500 feature, mid-length, and short films...
+
Towards No Earthly Pole / Julian Charrière
January 31 – March 21, 2020
Filmed at night, the dazzling landscapes captured are dramatically lit by a spotlight carried on a drone; as light...
+
Katy Moran / Recent Paintings
Jan 11 – Feb 19, 2020
Recently described as an ​“abstract painter of figurative mood,” Moran enlists a wide scope of mark-making to conjure different...
+
Joanna Piotrowska
January 24 – March 7, 2020
The tension is triggered by the reversibility of the situations, gestures and actions staged, the suspended moment of an...
+
Botanical Drift / Ebbe Stub Wittrup
January 23 – May 17, 2020
As Ebbe Stub Wittrup follows in the footsteps of the Danish botanist Nathaniel Wallich, a narrative emerges on Western...
+
ARTPIL / Prescription .109
Civilization and its Discontent
A State of emergency is declared in Canberra, Australia. The Novel coronavirus continues to spread. The Impeachment hearings in...
+
Southern Rites / Gillian Laub
Various engagements / 2020
This small town symbolized the archetype of pastoral American life. Yet this idyllic place was also held hostage by...
+
Reading Time in Space
Modernism at mumok
This exhibit traces passages of time and artistic concepts, accounting the idea of an expanded concept of art, one...
+
International Film Festival Rotterdam 2020
Jan 22 – Feb 2, 2020
One of the largest film festivals in the world, the IFFR presents over 500 feature, mid-length, and short films...
+