Paul Rand
designer

Paul Rand (1914–1996) was a well-known American graphic designer, best known for his corporate logo designs. Rand was educated at the Pratt Institute, the Parsons School of Design, and the Art Students League. He was one of the originators of the Swiss Style of graphic design. From 1956 to 1969, and beginning again in 1974, Rand taught design at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. Rand was inducted into the New York Art Directors Club Hall of Fame in 1972. He designed many posters and corporate identities, including the logos for IBM, UPS and ABC. Rand died of cancer in 1996.

Paul Rand
designer

Paul Rand (1914–1996) was a well-known American graphic designer, best known for his corporate logo designs. Rand was educated at the Pratt Institute, the Parsons School of Design, and the Art Students League. He was one of the originators of the Swiss Style of graphic design. From 1956 to 1969, and beginning again in 1974, Rand taught design at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. Rand was inducted into the New York Art Directors Club Hall of Fame in 1972. He designed many posters and corporate identities, including the logos for IBM, UPS and ABC. Rand died of cancer in 1996.

  • Cindy Sherman: Film Stills
    May 2 – Jun 1, 2024
    Skarstedt
    Paris, France
    Skarstedt Paris is pleased to present Cindy Sherman: Film Stills (1977-1980), an exhibition reuniting 25 artworks from the artist’s groundbreaking series exploring questions around gender and identity. Through her iconic alter-egos, Sherman masterfully transforms herself into a multitude of cinematic characters, each narrative unfolding like a scene from an enigmatic film. This exhibition offers an opportunity to delve into the depths of Sherman’s creative process (more…)
  • Maria Sturm: You Don’t Look Native to Me
    Publication
    Void
    International
    In 2011, Maria Sturm began to photograph the lives of young people from the Lumbee Tribe around Pembroke, Robeson County, North Carolina. Through the process of documenting their lives, Sturm began to question her own understanding of what it means to be Native American. Her new book You Don’t Look Native to Me combines photographs with interviews and texts to preconceptions and show Native identity not as fixed, but evolving and redefining itself with each generation. (more…)