Rose Finn-Kelcey, The Restless Image: a discrepancy between the seen position and the felt position, 1975. Copyright the Estate of Rose Finn-Kelcey

Rose Finn-Kelcey, Life, Belief and Beyond installation view, 2017 © Modern Art Oxford. Photo: Ben Westoby

Rose Finn-Kelcey, Life, Belief and Beyond installation view, 2017 © Modern Art Oxford. Photo: Ben Westoby

Rose Finn-Kelcey, Life, Belief and Beyond installation view, 2017 © Modern Art Oxford. Photo: Ben Westoby
© Estate of Rose Finn-Kelcey
Rose Finn-Kelcey
Artist

Born in Northampton, 1945, Rose Finn-Kelcey studied at Ravensbourne College and then at Chelsea College of Art, later becoming a major figure in the contemporary British art scene for over four decades. She continued to live and work in London from 1968 until her death in 2014.

Finn-Kelcey’s engagement with questions of power and agency was a driving force behind her decision to stage works within the public institutions that shape our civic realm. Such interventions included her striking flag works, such as Fog, flown from Alexandra Palace in 1971, and Power for the People, hoisted briefly at Battersea Power Station in 1972. Since her death, Finn-Kelcey’s work has been the subject of increasing attention, as the themes she was concerned with have re-entered the public consciousness: feminism, spirituality, commodity culture and individual empowerment, to name a few.

Over the course of her career Finn-Kelcey exhibited at numerous galleries in the UK including The Royal Academy of Art, Whitechapel Gallery, the Hayward Gallery, the Saatchi Gallery and Tate Britain. Her work can be found in national and international collections, most notably within the Tate collection, Arts Council Collection, British Council Collection and the Victoria & Albert Collection.

[Modern Art Oxford]

Rose Finn-Kelcey
Artist

Born in Northampton, 1945, Rose Finn-Kelcey studied at Ravensbourne College and then at Chelsea College of Art, later becoming a major figure in the contemporary British art scene for over four decades. She continued to live and work in London from 1968 until her death in 2014.

Finn-Kelcey’s engagement with questions of power and agency was a driving force behind her decision to stage works within the public institutions that shape our civic realm. Such interventions included her striking flag works, such as Fog, flown from Alexandra Palace in 1971, and Power for the People, hoisted briefly at Battersea Power Station in 1972. Since her death, Finn-Kelcey’s work has been the subject of increasing attention, as the themes she was concerned with have re-entered the public consciousness: feminism, spirituality, commodity culture and individual empowerment, to name a few.

Over the course of her career Finn-Kelcey exhibited at numerous galleries in the UK including The Royal Academy of Art, Whitechapel Gallery, the Hayward Gallery, the Saatchi Gallery and Tate Britain. Her work can be found in national and international collections, most notably within the Tate collection, Arts Council Collection, British Council Collection and the Victoria & Albert Collection.

[Modern Art Oxford]

Rose Finn-Kelcey, The Restless Image: a discrepancy between the seen position and the felt position, 1975. Copyright the Estate of Rose Finn-Kelcey

Rose Finn-Kelcey, Life, Belief and Beyond installation view, 2017 © Modern Art Oxford. Photo: Ben Westoby

Rose Finn-Kelcey, Life, Belief and Beyond installation view, 2017 © Modern Art Oxford. Photo: Ben Westoby

Rose Finn-Kelcey, Life, Belief and Beyond installation view, 2017 © Modern Art Oxford. Photo: Ben Westoby
  • June Clark: Witness
    May 3 – Aug 11, 2024
    The Power Plant
    Toronto, Canada
    June Clark: Witness is the first survey in Canada of the Toronto-based artist June Clark, who, since the late 1960s, has developed a unique and groundbreaking practice spanning photo-based work, text, collage, installation, and sculptural assemblages. Born in Harlem, New York, Clark immigrated to Canada in 1968 and subsequently made Toronto her home. The questions of identity formation and their connection to our points of origin fuel her practice. (more…)
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  • Anne Imhof: Wish You Were Gay
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    Kunsthaus Bregenz
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    Kunsthaus Bregenz is delighted to announce Wish You Were Gay, an exhibition by Anne Imhof. Spanning all four floors of KUB, Wish You Were Gay is simultaneously a personal survey and an all new body of work that reflects on and further develops a number of core elements that have constituted Imhof’s repertoire of artistic expression. Wish You Were Gay includes bas-reliefs, large scale oil paintings, sculptures, stage elements and stadium lighting, as well as new video works made of archival footage from her origins (more…)
  • Bastardie
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    KADIST
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    How can speech practices that trouble official languages disrupt the established social order and open up other configurations? Do they have the potential to impact the way we look or act? Its title pays tribute to Alice Becker-ho, a linguist associated with the Situationist International, known for her interest in the lexicons of gypsies and Roma. (more…)
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