Simryn Gill
Artist

Simryn Gill was born in 1959 in Singapore, raised in Malaysia, and educated in India and the United Kingdom. She works in sculpture, photography, drawing, and writing. She is a systematic collector, especially of books as objects of reverence and dispute. Several of her projects involve erasing or excising the printed word in a microcosmic struggle with authority as embodied by canonical texts. In Pearls (2000–), for example, she turns beloved volumes into paper pulp beads. Gill is a tinkerer, altering mundane objects and sites via poetically critical sleight of hand. She aggregates her modest interventions into encyclopedic series comprised of dozens of components, in which the smallest gestures – repeated or expanded – generate resounding statements.

For Roadkill (1999–2000), Gill collected hundreds of pieces of motor vehicle-flattened detritus—including bottle tops, cigarette packs, combs, plastic cutlery, and tin cans—and attached toy wheels to each one. She then arranged them on the floor in a swarming unidirectional traffic pattern. In Throwback (2007), Gill uses natural materials to recreate the internal systems of a Tata truck, a vehicle ubiquitous in Malaysia and India. She utilized termite mound soil, river clay, banana skins, mangosteen peels, bodhi leaves, coconut bark, areca nut casings, and lalang grass, among other things, to cast the individual parts, which were then arranged as an inventory. In the photographic series My Own Private Angkor (2007–09), Gill memorialized the derelict interiors of a decades-old abandoned housing complex on the Malaysian coast. Captured in long-exposure black-and-white, these images are both documents and objects in themselves, as light, dust, reflections, and shadows are rendered as tangible as the crumbling buildings.

Gill has had numerous solo exhibitions, including shows at Galeri Petronas, Kuala Lumpur (2001); Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney (2002); Berkeley Art Museum, California (2004); Tate Modern, London (2006); Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian, Washington, D.C. (2006); Tracy Williams, New York (2006, 2009, 2010, and 2012); Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney (2008); Jhaveri Contemporary, Mumbai (2009); Center for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne (2009); Breenspace, Sydney (2009 and 2012); Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne (2010); and AnnaElle Gallery, Stockholm (2012). She participated in the two-person exhibition Your place or mine? Fiona Foley and Simryn Gill at the Institute of Modern Art in Brisbane. Notable group exhibitions include the Singapore Biennial (2006), Documenta 12 and 13 (2007 and 2012), and 12th Istanbul Biennial (2011). She represented Australia at the 2013 Venice Biennale. Gill lives and works in Sydney and Port Dickson, Malaysia.

[Guggenheim]

Simryn Gill
Artist

Simryn Gill was born in 1959 in Singapore, raised in Malaysia, and educated in India and the United Kingdom. She works in sculpture, photography, drawing, and writing. She is a systematic collector, especially of books as objects of reverence and dispute. Several of her projects involve erasing or excising the printed word in a microcosmic struggle with authority as embodied by canonical texts. In Pearls (2000–), for example, she turns beloved volumes into paper pulp beads. Gill is a tinkerer, altering mundane objects and sites via poetically critical sleight of hand. She aggregates her modest interventions into encyclopedic series comprised of dozens of components, in which the smallest gestures – repeated or expanded – generate resounding statements.

For Roadkill (1999–2000), Gill collected hundreds of pieces of motor vehicle-flattened detritus—including bottle tops, cigarette packs, combs, plastic cutlery, and tin cans—and attached toy wheels to each one. She then arranged them on the floor in a swarming unidirectional traffic pattern. In Throwback (2007), Gill uses natural materials to recreate the internal systems of a Tata truck, a vehicle ubiquitous in Malaysia and India. She utilized termite mound soil, river clay, banana skins, mangosteen peels, bodhi leaves, coconut bark, areca nut casings, and lalang grass, among other things, to cast the individual parts, which were then arranged as an inventory. In the photographic series My Own Private Angkor (2007–09), Gill memorialized the derelict interiors of a decades-old abandoned housing complex on the Malaysian coast. Captured in long-exposure black-and-white, these images are both documents and objects in themselves, as light, dust, reflections, and shadows are rendered as tangible as the crumbling buildings.

Gill has had numerous solo exhibitions, including shows at Galeri Petronas, Kuala Lumpur (2001); Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney (2002); Berkeley Art Museum, California (2004); Tate Modern, London (2006); Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian, Washington, D.C. (2006); Tracy Williams, New York (2006, 2009, 2010, and 2012); Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney (2008); Jhaveri Contemporary, Mumbai (2009); Center for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne (2009); Breenspace, Sydney (2009 and 2012); Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne (2010); and AnnaElle Gallery, Stockholm (2012). She participated in the two-person exhibition Your place or mine? Fiona Foley and Simryn Gill at the Institute of Modern Art in Brisbane. Notable group exhibitions include the Singapore Biennial (2006), Documenta 12 and 13 (2007 and 2012), and 12th Istanbul Biennial (2011). She represented Australia at the 2013 Venice Biennale. Gill lives and works in Sydney and Port Dickson, Malaysia.

[Guggenheim]

  • Unhealed
    Mar 3 – Sep 15, 2024
    Moderna Museet
    Malmö, Sweden
    The international group exhibition Unhealed delves into the aftermath of the uprisings and revolutions, that swept through the Arab world starting in 2010. These events altered the lives of millions of people, many of whom as a consequence now live in Sweden. With this exhibition, Moderna Museet Malmö proudly presents seventeen artist who, in poignant and thought-provoking ways, have addressed this still unfolding chapter in history. (more…)
  • Fumi Nagasaka: Dora, Yerkwood, Walker County, Alabama
    Publication
    Gost
    International
    During the 2016 US Presidential elections Japanese photographer, Fumi Nagasaka, became intrigued by the rural and southern USA. She had lived in New York City for a decade but despite travelling the world, had yet to visit the rest of the US. All this changed when her friend, Tanya Rouse, invited her to her hometown of Dora, Alabama. Nagasaka continued to visit Dora over several years, gradually building a photographic archive of her visits. (more…)
  • popular
    Oct 5, 2023 – Apr 14, 2024
    Institut Valencià d’Art Modern / IVAM
    Valencia, Spain
    What is “popular”? Popular is not fame or celebrity. Popular is not the products of mass culture. Popular is not pop. Popular is not the art of the people, nor the identity of the country, nor the symbols of the nation. The popular is not the product of the proletariat or the craftsmanship of the working classes. The popular is not folklore. The popular is not clichés or tourist souvenirs.The popular is not visual candy, one-euro merchandise, advertising royalties. Popular is somewhere in-between all of that (more…)
  • Leda Papaconstantinou: Time In My Hands. A Retrospective
    Dec 14, 2023 – Apr 21, 2024
    EMST
    Athens, Greece
    Time in my hands represents the first ever major retrospective exhibition for Leda Papaconstantinou (b. 1945), one of the most important artists in the history of contemporary art in Greece. For over almost five decades, Papaconstantinou developed a diverse body of work that took on a range of forms – performance, sculpture, video, site-specific installations, painting, etc. – in order to explore issues of gender, sexuality, collective and personal memory, history, politics and ecology, centred always on the body. (more…)