Photo Guido Guidi
Stephen Shore
Photographer

Stephen Shore’s photographs are attentive to ordinary scenes of daily experience, yet through color – and composition – Shore transforms the mundane into subjects of thoughtful meditation. A restaurant meal on a road trip, a billboard off a highway, and a dusty side street in a Texas town are all seemingly banal images, but upon reflection subtly imply meaning. Color photography attracted Shore for its ability to record the range and intensity of hues seen in life. In 1971, at age twenty-three, he became the first living photographer to have a one-person show at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. His 1982 book, Uncommon Places became a bible for young photographers seeking to work in color, because, along with that of William Eggleston, his work exemplified the fact that the medium could be considered art.

Stephen Shore was born in New York in 1947. His work has been exhibited and collected at such venues as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the Library of Congress, Washington DC, The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, International Center of Photography, New York, Getty Museum, Los Angeles, CA, Foundation Cartier, Jouy-en-Josas, France, Renwick Gallery, and the National Collection of Fine Arts, Washington, DC.

Awards have included Royal Photographic Society, Honorary Fellow, German Photographic Society, Culture Prize, Aperture Foundation Award, National Endowment for the Arts, Guggenheim Foundation.

He currently lives and works in New York.

Stephen Shore
Photographer

Stephen Shore’s photographs are attentive to ordinary scenes of daily experience, yet through color – and composition – Shore transforms the mundane into subjects of thoughtful meditation. A restaurant meal on a road trip, a billboard off a highway, and a dusty side street in a Texas town are all seemingly banal images, but upon reflection subtly imply meaning. Color photography attracted Shore for its ability to record the range and intensity of hues seen in life. In 1971, at age twenty-three, he became the first living photographer to have a one-person show at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. His 1982 book, Uncommon Places became a bible for young photographers seeking to work in color, because, along with that of William Eggleston, his work exemplified the fact that the medium could be considered art.

Stephen Shore was born in New York in 1947. His work has been exhibited and collected at such venues as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the Library of Congress, Washington DC, The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, International Center of Photography, New York, Getty Museum, Los Angeles, CA, Foundation Cartier, Jouy-en-Josas, France, Renwick Gallery, and the National Collection of Fine Arts, Washington, DC.

Awards have included Royal Photographic Society, Honorary Fellow, German Photographic Society, Culture Prize, Aperture Foundation Award, National Endowment for the Arts, Guggenheim Foundation.

He currently lives and works in New York.

  • A Real Woman
    Jul 15 – Aug 12, 2024
    The Gallery / Artichoke
    Various Locations, UK
    “When approaching the subject ‘A Real Woman’, I felt it crucial that this was not a question to be answered, but rather a statement to be considered. There is no single or simple definition of a woman. I hope the different perspectives presented by our artists will inspire viewers to consider the plurality of the womanhood, and thereby encourage understanding and empathy towards those whose lives are shaped differently from their own. (more…)
  • Mary Frey: My Mother, My Son.
    Publication
    TBW Books
    International
    Using the title of her 2004 photograph, My Mother, My Son, as an inspirational and creative starting point, Mary Frey pulls from her vast archive of photographs to create a pictorial story collapsing linear time. Frey intimately and masterfully captures subjects at ease in environments that feel, at once, wholly familiar yet unmoored from their own reality. (more…)
  • LaToya Ruby Frazier: Monuments of Solidarity
    May 12 – Sep 7, 2024
    MoMA
    New York, USA
    “For this reason, it is incumbent upon me to resist – one photograph at a time, one photo essay at a time, one body of work at a time, one book at a time, one workers’ monument at a time – historical erasure and historical amnesia,” says artist-activist LaToya Ruby Frazier. Born in 1982 in the steel manufacturing town of Braddock, Pennsylvania, Frazier has used photography, text, moving images, and performance to revive and preserve forgotten stories of labor, gender, and race (more…)
SUBMIT YOUR ANNOUNCEMENTS
Visit our New Announcement Submission page > Announcement Submission page >