In these photographs, the built environment, static and inanimate, is the stage in which a walking choreography is played out. The humans, who bring the animate, are spatially arranged as though carefully directed. They appear to have been preconditioned to act like automatons or self-absorbed passers-by uncannily acting out parts in mental isolation. I’m looking for rhythm in moving figures and to have them separated visually within plastic space. In a landscape rendered anew by technological change, it’s the spaces between the human inhabitants that are equally likely to control the narrative. Even though I’m working in a real environment, shooting it in this way can give it an unreal look. Perhaps the influence of digital technology on the City is already illustrating the boundary between the real and the virtual world, like Goddard’s Alphaville which, through deft use of real locations, transformed a real city into a science fictional one. The omni-prevalence of digital technology has shifted our sense of what it is to belong to a community. We read, write, hear and see differently because of it. It follows therefore, that I should be documenting the city differently and in the process attempting a different form of street photography.

StreetMax21
Photographer

Born in Scotland, I work mainly in London and Norfolk, UK. My street photography has been shown in various festivals and group shows internationally. Having been selected as the Juror’s Pick in the LensCulture Street Photography Awards in 2017, I’ve gone on to win several awards including series winner at PHoS Athens, Best Series award at Streetfoto, San Francisco in 2017, street category winner of the Neutral Density Awards and series winner in the 13th Pollux Awards street category in 2019. I’ve shown also in a number of galleries in the United Kingdom, United States, Hungary, Greece, Turkey, Italy, France and Spain. In 2020, I became a member of the street photography collective iN-PUBLiC, and was included in its first online exhibition The Square Mile. I was a top 50 photographer in Photolucida Critical Mass 2023, and was selected as a Talent in Fresh Eyes 2024.

I take an observational view of how our present circumstances govern our behaviour individually and in crowds. Adhering to the rules of candid street photography, I often ‘build’ shots by waiting for satisfactory outcomes in real time. Extensively, I’ve used photographic layering to make a comment about aspects of human behaviour in cities. It’s a particular technique I’ve chosen, to make a body of work which, I feel, gives visual expression to the human condition now.

StreetMax21
Photographer

Born in Scotland, I work mainly in London and Norfolk, UK. My street photography has been shown in various festivals and group shows internationally. Having been selected as the Juror’s Pick in the LensCulture Street Photography Awards in 2017, I’ve gone on to win several awards including series winner at PHoS Athens, Best Series award at Streetfoto, San Francisco in 2017, street category winner of the Neutral Density Awards and series winner in the 13th Pollux Awards street category in 2019. I’ve shown also in a number of galleries in the United Kingdom, United States, Hungary, Greece, Turkey, Italy, France and Spain. In 2020, I became a member of the street photography collective iN-PUBLiC, and was included in its first online exhibition The Square Mile. I was a top 50 photographer in Photolucida Critical Mass 2023, and was selected as a Talent in Fresh Eyes 2024.

I take an observational view of how our present circumstances govern our behaviour individually and in crowds. Adhering to the rules of candid street photography, I often ‘build’ shots by waiting for satisfactory outcomes in real time. Extensively, I’ve used photographic layering to make a comment about aspects of human behaviour in cities. It’s a particular technique I’ve chosen, to make a body of work which, I feel, gives visual expression to the human condition now.

In these photographs, the built environment, static and inanimate, is the stage in which a walking choreography is played out. The humans, who bring the animate, are spatially arranged as though carefully directed. They appear to have been preconditioned to act like automatons or self-absorbed passers-by uncannily acting out parts in mental isolation. I’m looking for rhythm in moving figures and to have them separated visually within plastic space. In a landscape rendered anew by technological change, it’s the spaces between the human inhabitants that are equally likely to control the narrative. Even though I’m working in a real environment, shooting it in this way can give it an unreal look. Perhaps the influence of digital technology on the City is already illustrating the boundary between the real and the virtual world, like Goddard’s Alphaville which, through deft use of real locations, transformed a real city into a science fictional one. The omni-prevalence of digital technology has shifted our sense of what it is to belong to a community. We read, write, hear and see differently because of it. It follows therefore, that I should be documenting the city differently and in the process attempting a different form of street photography.

  • Maggie Lee: Magazine
    Feb 10 – May 20, 2024
    Kunsthalle Zürich
    Zürich, Switzerland
    The exhibition Magazine was born out of the artist’s long-held desire to publish her own magazine – a very personal magazine that would nonetheless circulate further than just her own circle of friends. Maggie Lee’s passion for this medium of distribution was inspired by her work in copy stores, and above all by creating zines since her teenage years in New Jersey. There is a special appeal to the creative self-realisation in self-publishing (more…)
  • Adraint Khadafhi Bereal: The Black Yearbook
    Publication
    4 Color Books / Penguin Random House
    International
    When photographer Adraint Bereal graduated from the University of Texas, he self-published an impressive volume of portraits, personal statements, and interviews that explored UT’s campus culture and offered an intimate look at the lives of Black students matriculating within a majority white space. Bereal’s work was inspired by his first photo exhibition at the George Washington Carver Museum in Austin, entitled 1.7, that unearthed the experiences of the 925 Black men that made up just 1.7% of UT’s total 52,000 student body. (more…)