Tom Wood
Photographer

Although Wood photographed working class Liverpool exclusively for many years, his primary interest is not documentary. Trained as a painter at the conceptually orientated Leicester Polytechnic from 1973–76, his first exploration of lens-based media was through extensive viewing of experimental films. His photography has explored a “multiplicity of formally divergent themes and quotations”, his approach “much more fluid than the current conventions of post-Conceptual photography or photojournalism dictate.” He has worked with color negative film continuously since 1976, while often using both black and white and color in different locations.

The pictures in his first book, Looking For Love (1989) were made between 1982 and 1985, and features the infamous Chelsea Reach nightclub. This was followed by the highly acclaimed All Zones Off Peak (1998) featuring pictures resulting from spending eighteen years riding the buses of Liverpool during his 1978 to 1996 ‘bus odyssey’ – the images selected from 100,000 negatives. The book People followed this in 1999, and the major retrospective book Photie Man made in collaboration with Irish artist Padraig Timoney, was published in 2005.

His work is also included in the revised edition of Bystander: the History of Street Photography (2001) and his book All Zones Off Peak featured in The Photo Book: A History vol.2 (2006). Wood received the Terence Donovan Award from the Royal Photographic Society in 1998 and the Prix Dialogue de l’Humanité at Les Recontres d’Arles, France in 2002.

Currently working part time as a lecturer in photography at Coleg Llandrillo in north Wales.

[LensCulture]

Tom Wood
Photographer

Although Wood photographed working class Liverpool exclusively for many years, his primary interest is not documentary. Trained as a painter at the conceptually orientated Leicester Polytechnic from 1973–76, his first exploration of lens-based media was through extensive viewing of experimental films. His photography has explored a “multiplicity of formally divergent themes and quotations”, his approach “much more fluid than the current conventions of post-Conceptual photography or photojournalism dictate.” He has worked with color negative film continuously since 1976, while often using both black and white and color in different locations.

The pictures in his first book, Looking For Love (1989) were made between 1982 and 1985, and features the infamous Chelsea Reach nightclub. This was followed by the highly acclaimed All Zones Off Peak (1998) featuring pictures resulting from spending eighteen years riding the buses of Liverpool during his 1978 to 1996 ‘bus odyssey’ – the images selected from 100,000 negatives. The book People followed this in 1999, and the major retrospective book Photie Man made in collaboration with Irish artist Padraig Timoney, was published in 2005.

His work is also included in the revised edition of Bystander: the History of Street Photography (2001) and his book All Zones Off Peak featured in The Photo Book: A History vol.2 (2006). Wood received the Terence Donovan Award from the Royal Photographic Society in 1998 and the Prix Dialogue de l’Humanité at Les Recontres d’Arles, France in 2002.

Currently working part time as a lecturer in photography at Coleg Llandrillo in north Wales.

[LensCulture]

  • A Model
    Feb 9 – Sep 8, 2024
    Mudam
    Luxembourg
    We all have ideas of what a contemporary art museum should be. Those who founded Mudam Luxembourg, for example, envisioned a museum that would encompass many aspects of contemporary culture, such as art, design and architecture. While one believes the museum to be a place for the presentation of modern art, others view it as a showcase for Luxembourgish creation. And some see Mudam as a space for collectivity, for openness, for events and an experimental approach. (more…)
  • Silke Schönfeld: No More Butter Scenes
    Jun 27–30, 2024
    Kunsthalle Münster
    Münster, Germany
    The video installation No More Butter Scenes (2024) examines the relationship between consent and intimacy in the context of the acting profession. In 2007, around 35 years after the premiere of Tango in Paris (1972), actress Maria Schneider spoke for the first time about the sexual abuse she experienced during the shooting of the infamous butter scene. Director Bernardo Bertolucci argued that it was only by not informing his leading actress in advance of how the scene with co-star Marlon Brando would take place that he was able to capture her authentic frustration and anger. (more…)
  • UNIQUE. Beyond Photography
    Apr 19 – Jun 8, 2024
    Hangar
    Brussels, Belgium
    In the UNIQUE exhibition, we explore 21 projects by artists, half of whom are under 40 and based in Belgium. What unites them is the creative gesture. It’s no longer just the photographic perspective, but the manual labor that is celebrated here. Establishing this physical connection with the artwork results in the creation of unique pieces that defy the norms of analog photography and oppose the reproducibility of digital photography. (more…)