Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art
Museum / Chicago

The Institute was founded in 1971 through the initiative of art collectors Dr. Achilles and Vera Chreptowsky, and sculptors Konstantin Milonadis and Mychajlo Urban. They wanted to fill a void in the public’s understanding of nationally and internationally recognized Ukrainian artists engaged with contemporary art. Like so many independent artist organizations across the United States of the early 1970s, they emerged as an alternative exhibition venue, featuring art unsupported by large-scale mainstream art institutions. These included works by Canadian artists, Chicago artists beginning their professional careers, Ukrainian, Polish and Lithuanian artists, as well as first generation computer art, book art, fiber and ceramics. Approximately eight exhibitions were shown each year, accompanied by literary and music programs, artist workshops and programs for children. Studio space was also rented to local artists.

Today the UIMA is home to one of the world’s largest collections of Ukrainian-American abstract and minimalist works from the 1950s, 60s and 70s. The UIMA collection is increasingly being recognized for its breadth and quality. Many of the artists represented have world-class reputations; their works can also be found such places as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Gallery, and the Barnes Collection.

Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art
Museum / Chicago

The Institute was founded in 1971 through the initiative of art collectors Dr. Achilles and Vera Chreptowsky, and sculptors Konstantin Milonadis and Mychajlo Urban. They wanted to fill a void in the public’s understanding of nationally and internationally recognized Ukrainian artists engaged with contemporary art. Like so many independent artist organizations across the United States of the early 1970s, they emerged as an alternative exhibition venue, featuring art unsupported by large-scale mainstream art institutions. These included works by Canadian artists, Chicago artists beginning their professional careers, Ukrainian, Polish and Lithuanian artists, as well as first generation computer art, book art, fiber and ceramics. Approximately eight exhibitions were shown each year, accompanied by literary and music programs, artist workshops and programs for children. Studio space was also rented to local artists.

Today the UIMA is home to one of the world’s largest collections of Ukrainian-American abstract and minimalist works from the 1950s, 60s and 70s. The UIMA collection is increasingly being recognized for its breadth and quality. Many of the artists represented have world-class reputations; their works can also be found such places as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Gallery, and the Barnes Collection.

Bio, Banner: Bonnie Peterson / Main: Christine Han
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