Felix Nussbaum
artist / painter

The German-Jewish surrealist painter Felix Nussbaum was born in Osnabrück in 1904. In 1922 he studies at the Hamburg State School of Applied Arts. In 1923 he attends the private Lewin Funcke School in Berlin. In 1924-25 he is a student of the Berlin School of Fine and Applied Arts and is master student of Hans Meid in 1928-29. As of 1929 he has a studio together with the Polish painter and later partner and wife Felka Platek.

Felix Nussbaum receives a scholarship for the Villa Massimo in Rome in 1932. With the National socialists taking over power in 1933, the political and cultural atmosphere in Germany undergoes drastic changes. His Berlin studio is set on fire because of his Jewish belief, some 150 works fall victim to the flames. His scholarship at the Villa Massimo was at first extended by three months, but then it was cancelled and Nussbaum had to leave suddenly. His paintings are sent to him in Alassio.

In 1935 Felix Nussbaum and his wife are in Paris, from where they travel to Oostende. He changes his place of residence in Belgium several times. The couple lives in Brussels as of 1937. As German troops march into Belgium in 1940, Nussbaum is arrested as a hostile foreigner and has to go to a detention camp in Saint-Cyprien, from where he manages to escape. He goes back to Brussels. Felix Nussbaum hides his paintings with two friends in 1942. He and his wife hide in the apartment of the Belgian sculptor Dolf Ledel. But Nussbaum continues working, despite all miseries – because of the smell of turpentine, which could reveal his hiding place, he works in the basement of the house of an art dealer that he is friends with.

In the 1940s he makes a number of extraordinary self portraits and haunting pictures, dealing with his personal impressions. He makes the Selbstbildnis mit Judenpass (Self Portrait with Jewish Passport) in 1943. Nussbaum and his wife are arrested on June 20, 1944 and are deported to Auschwitz where he dies on July 31, 1944.

Felix Nussbaum is one of the main representatives of New Objectivity. His hometown opens the Felix Nussbaum House in 1998, where 170 works, some two thirds of this oeuvre, are shown.

Felix Nussbaum
artist / painter

The German-Jewish surrealist painter Felix Nussbaum was born in Osnabrück in 1904. In 1922 he studies at the Hamburg State School of Applied Arts. In 1923 he attends the private Lewin Funcke School in Berlin. In 1924-25 he is a student of the Berlin School of Fine and Applied Arts and is master student of Hans Meid in 1928-29. As of 1929 he has a studio together with the Polish painter and later partner and wife Felka Platek.

Felix Nussbaum receives a scholarship for the Villa Massimo in Rome in 1932. With the National socialists taking over power in 1933, the political and cultural atmosphere in Germany undergoes drastic changes. His Berlin studio is set on fire because of his Jewish belief, some 150 works fall victim to the flames. His scholarship at the Villa Massimo was at first extended by three months, but then it was cancelled and Nussbaum had to leave suddenly. His paintings are sent to him in Alassio.

In 1935 Felix Nussbaum and his wife are in Paris, from where they travel to Oostende. He changes his place of residence in Belgium several times. The couple lives in Brussels as of 1937. As German troops march into Belgium in 1940, Nussbaum is arrested as a hostile foreigner and has to go to a detention camp in Saint-Cyprien, from where he manages to escape. He goes back to Brussels. Felix Nussbaum hides his paintings with two friends in 1942. He and his wife hide in the apartment of the Belgian sculptor Dolf Ledel. But Nussbaum continues working, despite all miseries – because of the smell of turpentine, which could reveal his hiding place, he works in the basement of the house of an art dealer that he is friends with.

In the 1940s he makes a number of extraordinary self portraits and haunting pictures, dealing with his personal impressions. He makes the Selbstbildnis mit Judenpass (Self Portrait with Jewish Passport) in 1943. Nussbaum and his wife are arrested on June 20, 1944 and are deported to Auschwitz where he dies on July 31, 1944.

Felix Nussbaum is one of the main representatives of New Objectivity. His hometown opens the Felix Nussbaum House in 1998, where 170 works, some two thirds of this oeuvre, are shown.

  • Patrick Weldé: Freiheit
    Publication
    Goswell Road
    International
    On the occasion of our exhibition with Weldé at CFAlive Milan L’AMOUR TOUJOURS, we publish a new edition of the previously sold-out book that we produced with Weldé in 2017, FREIHEIT. All of the photographs in FREIHEIT were taken by Weldé on disposable cameras between 2011-2015. They show a tender side to the artist and his friend circle, and the purest form of trust. (more…)
  • Georg Kussmann: FRG
    Publication
    MACK
    International
    The German dramatist Heiner Müller observed that German history lies as if smothered by a rheumatism blanket: beneath there is warmth and stagnation, just enough to give the impression all is well, while the peripheries are freezing. Georg Kussmann’s photographs in FRG were created under this metaphoric blanket. Made in the Federal Republic of Germany over a single summer, they depict everyday scenes of life, work, and leisure (more…)
  • Grey Crawford. Chroma, 1978–85, Vol 1
    Publication
    Beam Editions
    International
    In 1978 Grey Crawford created a body of colour photographic work that was so radical in its aesthetic and technique that few people to this day understand how it was made. Chroma documents late 70s Los Angeles in a period of radical urban transformation. Scenes of vernacular architecture, demolition sites and everyday places are contrasted with graphic forms that float on the surface and sit within the image. (more…)