Photo Lorenz Seidler / eSel
Ulrike Müller
Artist

Ulrike Müller (born 1971, Austria; lives in New York) engages relationships between abstraction and bodies, and a concept of painting that is not restricted to brush and canvas. Employing a wide range of materials and techniques including performance, publishing, and textiles, her work moves between different contexts and publics, invites collaboration, and expands to other realms of production in processes of exploration and exchange.

Müller studied art at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna, Austria, and participated in the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program, New York.

Müller’s work is currently on view in the exhibition Yesterday, Today, Today, at Kunstraum Buchberg, Austria, and will be featured in the 57th Carnegie International at the Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, PA. Most recently, she has participated in major group exhibitions including the Whitney Biennial (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2017); Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon (New Museum, New York, 2017); Invisible Adversaries (Hessel Museum of Art, New York, 2016); and Painting 2.0 (Museum Brandhorst Munich 2015 and Mumok, Vienna 2016). Her solo exhibition at the Kunstverein Düsseldorf, titled Container, will open in November 2018. Müller has also had solo exhibitions at Callicoon Fine Arts in New York (2014, 2016); Mumok – Museum of Modern Art Ludwig Foundation (2015), and Kunstraum Lakeside (2014), both in Austria. At Mumok, Müller co-curated the collection exhibition Always, Always, Others with Manuela Ammer. The book, Always, Always, Others was published on the occasion of Müller’s exhibitions at Mumok by the museum and Dancing Foxes Press (2017). In 2010, Müller represented Austria in the Cairo Biennial. She was a co-editor of the queer feminist journal, LTTR (2001–06), and organized Herstory Inventory. 100 Feminist Drawings by 100 Artists, a collaborative project that was exhibited together with objects from the respective collections at the Brooklyn Museum and at the Kunsthaus Bregenz in 2012.

[Callicoon Fine Arts]

Ulrike Müller
Artist

Ulrike Müller (born 1971, Austria; lives in New York) engages relationships between abstraction and bodies, and a concept of painting that is not restricted to brush and canvas. Employing a wide range of materials and techniques including performance, publishing, and textiles, her work moves between different contexts and publics, invites collaboration, and expands to other realms of production in processes of exploration and exchange.

Müller studied art at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna, Austria, and participated in the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program, New York.

Müller’s work is currently on view in the exhibition Yesterday, Today, Today, at Kunstraum Buchberg, Austria, and will be featured in the 57th Carnegie International at the Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, PA. Most recently, she has participated in major group exhibitions including the Whitney Biennial (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2017); Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon (New Museum, New York, 2017); Invisible Adversaries (Hessel Museum of Art, New York, 2016); and Painting 2.0 (Museum Brandhorst Munich 2015 and Mumok, Vienna 2016). Her solo exhibition at the Kunstverein Düsseldorf, titled Container, will open in November 2018. Müller has also had solo exhibitions at Callicoon Fine Arts in New York (2014, 2016); Mumok – Museum of Modern Art Ludwig Foundation (2015), and Kunstraum Lakeside (2014), both in Austria. At Mumok, Müller co-curated the collection exhibition Always, Always, Others with Manuela Ammer. The book, Always, Always, Others was published on the occasion of Müller’s exhibitions at Mumok by the museum and Dancing Foxes Press (2017). In 2010, Müller represented Austria in the Cairo Biennial. She was a co-editor of the queer feminist journal, LTTR (2001–06), and organized Herstory Inventory. 100 Feminist Drawings by 100 Artists, a collaborative project that was exhibited together with objects from the respective collections at the Brooklyn Museum and at the Kunsthaus Bregenz in 2012.

[Callicoon Fine Arts]

  • ICON – O – STASYS
    May 31 – Nov 3, 2024
    Stasys Museum
    Panevėžys, Lithuania
    On this day… Stasys arrives back at his home village, Lepšiai… It all happens in May 2024… That’s when the Stasys Museum opens up to the public, a museum titled after him. This was never predicted – the future from there, a little village, in the house within a disorderly wooden structure, run down with dripping roofs, filled with bellowing, roaring farm animals… No fairy tales could be heard there… But just one hour’s walk away from Lepšiai, the white rectangular building stands proudly in the city centre (more…)
  • Mikel Bastida: Anarene
    Publication
    Tipi Photo Bookshop
    International
    Anarene is a book that was born from an eight-year photographic project made by Mikel Bastida in the United States. In the spirit of referencing the ghost town in Archer County, Texas, portrayed in Peter Bogdanovich’s film adaptation of Larry McMurtry’s novel The Last Picture Show, the author has traveled the country looking for images and stories that cinema has left behind. (more…)
  • Hannah Villiger
    Apr 3 – Jul 22, 2024
    Centre Pompidou
    Paris, France
    Bringing together around 100 works and documents from the collections of the Musée National d’Art Moderne and the Estate of Hannah Villiger foundation, this monographic exhibition dedicated to Swiss artist Hannah Villiger is the first of its kind in France. It pays homage to an artistic practice that oscillated between sculpture, photography and spatial architecture, beginning in the early 1970s and evolving until the mid-1990s. (more…)
  • Atiéna R. Kilfa: Special Effect
    May 4 – Sep 8, 2024
    Den Frie
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    With Special Effect, Atiéna R. Kilfa presents a new body of works consisting of a short film and two large scale pencil drawings. In continuation of Kilfa’s investigation and restructuring of cinematic archetypes, Special Effect homes in on the nondescript figure of a man sitting at a desk. Shot in black and white, the film eerily evokes a timelessness of the figure by bringing it in resonance with pictorial genres reminiscent of various eras from German Expressionist cinema to the golden age of Hollywood film noir, fast forward to its 4K quality of today. (more…)
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