Scandinavia House
Cultural Center / organization

Scandinavia House: The Nordic Center in America is the leading center for Nordic culture in the United States, offers a wide range of programs that illuminate the culture and vitality of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Scandinavia House offerings include diverse exhibitions and film series, as well as concerts and other performances, readings, lectures, symposia, language courses, and children’s activities.

Designed by the internationally renowned Polshek Partnership Architects (now Ennead Architects) and inaugurated in October 2000, Scandinavia House is the headquarters of The American-Scandinavian Foundation (ASF) and the site of ASF’s cultural and educational programming and is located in New York City.

After a Dance is Dance / Photo Urban Joren
Scandinavia House
Cultural Center / organization

Scandinavia House: The Nordic Center in America is the leading center for Nordic culture in the United States, offers a wide range of programs that illuminate the culture and vitality of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Scandinavia House offerings include diverse exhibitions and film series, as well as concerts and other performances, readings, lectures, symposia, language courses, and children’s activities.

Designed by the internationally renowned Polshek Partnership Architects (now Ennead Architects) and inaugurated in October 2000, Scandinavia House is the headquarters of The American-Scandinavian Foundation (ASF) and the site of ASF’s cultural and educational programming and is located in New York City.

Ole Brodersen / String cloth and kite

 Scandinavia House

Libia Castro and Olafur Olafsson / Untitled

Helene Schjerfbeck

Sebastian Lelio / Disobedience

Scandinavia House

Danish Dance Theatre / Photo Soren Meisner

Aki Kaurismaki / The Other Side of Hope
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