Daido Moriyama
Photographer

Born in 1938 and brought up for a short while in Osaka, Japan, Daido Moriyama spent much of his childhood on the move, due to his father’s profession as a travelling insurance salesman.

Moriyama studied graphic design and, in the 1960s, moved to Tokyo to work with the VIVO group of photographers, which included Eikoh Hosoe and Shomei Tomatsu. Accompanied by a surge in Japanese economic growth and mass culture, Moriyama was published in several magazines and journals, earning him the accolade of Most Promising Photographer by the Japan Photography Critics Association.

Moriyama was a member of PROVOKE Magazine at the time of international youth movements and unrest in 1968. The magazine, and Moriyama’s photography, sought to assert an independence over the classically held notion of photography as purely a visual sign. He was aware that the camera can not offer a complete record and it is in this very partialness that the real excitement and enigma in his work arises.

Exploring themes of self-expression, the disfiguration of urban landscapes, eroticism and fading Japanese traditions, Moriyama remarked that one of photography’s essential qualities is its amateurism, and another its anonymity. These have numbered among his preoccupations from the beginning and most of Moriyama’s images follow a snapshot aesthetic, often taken while running or from a moving car, without the use of a viewfinder.

This monograph on Moriyama follows a chronological order, identifying major themes and examining key works; a beautifully produced, affordable introduction to one of the most influential figures in photography today.

[Phaidon]

Daido Moriyama
Photographer

Born in 1938 and brought up for a short while in Osaka, Japan, Daido Moriyama spent much of his childhood on the move, due to his father’s profession as a travelling insurance salesman.

Moriyama studied graphic design and, in the 1960s, moved to Tokyo to work with the VIVO group of photographers, which included Eikoh Hosoe and Shomei Tomatsu. Accompanied by a surge in Japanese economic growth and mass culture, Moriyama was published in several magazines and journals, earning him the accolade of Most Promising Photographer by the Japan Photography Critics Association.

Moriyama was a member of PROVOKE Magazine at the time of international youth movements and unrest in 1968. The magazine, and Moriyama’s photography, sought to assert an independence over the classically held notion of photography as purely a visual sign. He was aware that the camera can not offer a complete record and it is in this very partialness that the real excitement and enigma in his work arises.

Exploring themes of self-expression, the disfiguration of urban landscapes, eroticism and fading Japanese traditions, Moriyama remarked that one of photography’s essential qualities is its amateurism, and another its anonymity. These have numbered among his preoccupations from the beginning and most of Moriyama’s images follow a snapshot aesthetic, often taken while running or from a moving car, without the use of a viewfinder.

This monograph on Moriyama follows a chronological order, identifying major themes and examining key works; a beautifully produced, affordable introduction to one of the most influential figures in photography today.

[Phaidon]

  • Emilio Prini: …E Prini
    Oct 27, 2023 – Mar 31, 2024
    MACRO
    Rome, Italy
    …E Prini is the most extensive exhibition ever dedicated to the work of Emilio Prini (Stresa, 1943 – Rome, 2016). Comprising of over 250 works, the exhibition project, realized in collaboration with the Archivio Emilio Prini, is conceived according to a chronological path which spans fifty years, from 1966 to 2016, to reconstruct the work of one of Italy’s most complex and enigmatic artistic figures from the recent past, whose work has not been fully surveyed to this day. (more…)
  • Coexisting with Darkness
    Nov 9, 2023 – Mar 31, 2024
    Mystetskyi Arsenal
    Kyiv, Ukraine
    In October 2022, Russia began to systemically target the objects of the Ukrainian critical infrastructure, disrupting the supply of electricity, water, heat, and telecommunication. Missiles and UAV strikes led to the introduction of rolling blackouts, causing cities and villages to be periodically engulfed in darkness. ‘Energy terrorism’ tactics aimed to disrupt Ukraine’s ‘mental infrastructure’: to break people’s faith in their own strength and their trust in government. (more…)