ARTPIL Profiles of the Arts
First Lingering Mist of Spring
Feb 23 - Mar 24, 2019 / TOKAS

Nao Yoshigai / Across the Water, film, 2017

One way of expressing the seasons is the concept of “72 Micro-seasons” from ancient China. Each season name refers to changes shown by the weather, plants, and animals. This concept was adopted in Japan during the Edo Period, when it was partially revised by calendar scholars to match Japan’s landscape and climate. This exhibition opened in late February, which is called “Kasumi Hajimete Tanabiku,” or “Mist Begins to Linger.”

During this time, the cold, dry air steadily becomes moister, and the distant scenery appears hazy. The humid air combines with floating dust and other substances, which transform the light. The three artists in this exhibition sensitively perceive these slight, ordinary changes with their bodies and create layers to depict brand-new scenery in the exhibition space.

 

Masaharu Sato / Fukushima Trace, single channel video, 2018

Masaharu Sato / Fukushima Trace, single channel video, 2018

Masaharu Sato / Fukushima Trace, single channel video, 2018

Masaharu Sato

Sato films actual scenery and creates animations by tracing the individual frames on a computer. He released Tokyo Trace (2015-2016), which depicts the changing scenery of Tokyo, followed by Fukushima Trace (2018), his new video installation for this exhibition showing daily life in Fukushima. This piece, created during his fight with cancer, expresses the scenery of Fukushima (where he has traveled after the earthquake) while superimposing it on his own body being ravaged by cancer. Part of it is animated, blurring the lines between the ordinary and extraordinary and beckoning the viewer into the video.

 

Yu Nishimura / Act, acrylic on canvas, 2017

Yu Nishimura / Factory, oil on canvas, 2018

Yu Nishimura

Rather than reproducing actual scenery, Nishimura depicts the present moment while layering in the things he takes notice of in daily life. His paintings resemble landscapes or people you have seen somewhere before, or scenes from a tale. In this exhibition, they are displayed in the space in a way that naturally suggests a story linking the works next to each other. He will exhibit new paintings inspired by early spring at this exhibition, with the aim of inspiring viewers to spin new stories.

 

Nao Yoshigai / Breathing House, film, 2017

Nao Yoshigai / Hottamaru Days, film, 2015

Nao Yoshigai

Yoshigai uses video and sound to depict physical sensations, striving to create a new form of video expression. Her film Breathing House (2017) was shot at the Seizasha in Kyoto, where the Okada Seiza method of mental and physical cultivation popular in the Taisho Period was promoted, right before the building was destroyed. She carefully depicted the sounds that come from physical movements, linked with the determined breathing method and posture in which the subject sits quietly while holding the stomach strong. In this way, she filmed a scene that one doesn’t usually notice. For this exhibition, she will showcase a video installation that seems to integrate with the viewer’s body.

 

First Lingering Mist of Spring
ACT (Artists Contemporary TOKAS) Vol. 1
February 23 – March 24, 2019 / TOKAS
In cooperation with Imura Art Gallery, KAYOKOYUKIVenue
Visit the exhibition page >

Recent Articles
The Other Art Fair
Presented by Saatchi Art
Celebrated for its unique and immersive visitor experience, The Other Art Fair…
Celebrated for its unique and immersive visitor experience, The Other Art Fair has grown both in the UK…
CITTADIMILANO / Giorgio Andreotta Calò
Feb 14 - Jul 21, 2019 / Pirelli HangarBicocca
Among the contexts evoked, the city of Milan provides one of the…
Among the contexts evoked, the city of Milan provides one of the central premises of the exhibition which…
Valparaíso
Photography by Eleonore Simon
In a culture where improvisation has become an art form, Valparaíso’s charm…
In a culture where improvisation has become an art form, Valparaíso’s charm and grittiness instantly captured my imagination…
Plans for an Unused Land / Anna-Bella Papp
Through Apr 13, 2019 / Modern Art
Speculating on the potential uses of land, the series becomes personal musings…
Speculating on the potential uses of land, the series becomes personal musings on not only legacy and time,…
Luigi Ghirri / The Map and the Territory
Through June 2, 2019 / Jeu de Paume
“I am interested in ephemeral architecture, in objects generally regarded as bad…
“I am interested in ephemeral architecture, in objects generally regarded as bad taste, but which have never been…
ARTPIL / Prescription .087
Reflections on the Guillotine
Theresa May’s Brexit plan voted down again in the Parliament; Ethiopian Airlines…
Theresa May’s Brexit plan voted down again in the Parliament; Ethiopian Airlines tragedy takes 157 lives; California’s governor…
Nordic Impressions
Through Jun 8, 2019 / Scandinavia House
This exhibition brings together a wide array of artistic expressions, paintings, drawings,…
This exhibition brings together a wide array of artistic expressions, paintings, drawings, photographs, installations, films, and videos, that…
Wild is the Wind / Rebekka Steiger
Through Mar 30, 2019 / Galerie Urs Meile
Steiger painted extensively as a means to cope with the unknown environment…
Steiger painted extensively as a means to cope with the unknown environment she was plunged into, while new…
First Lingering Mist of Spring
Feb 23 - Mar 24, 2019 / TOKAS

Nao Yoshigai / Across the Water, film, 2017

One way of expressing the seasons is the concept of “72 Micro-seasons” from ancient China. Each season name refers to changes shown by the weather, plants, and animals. This concept was adopted in Japan during the Edo Period, when it was partially revised by calendar scholars to match Japan’s landscape and climate. This exhibition opened in late February, which is called “Kasumi Hajimete Tanabiku,” or “Mist Begins to Linger.”

During this time, the cold, dry air steadily becomes moister, and the distant scenery appears hazy. The humid air combines with floating dust and other substances, which transform the light. The three artists in this exhibition sensitively perceive these slight, ordinary changes with their bodies and create layers to depict brand-new scenery in the exhibition space.

 

Masaharu Sato / Fukushima Trace, single channel video, 2018

Masaharu Sato / Fukushima Trace, single channel video, 2018

Masaharu Sato / Fukushima Trace, single channel video, 2018

Masaharu Sato

Sato films actual scenery and creates animations by tracing the individual frames on a computer. He released Tokyo Trace (2015-2016), which depicts the changing scenery of Tokyo, followed by Fukushima Trace (2018), his new video installation for this exhibition showing daily life in Fukushima. This piece, created during his fight with cancer, expresses the scenery of Fukushima (where he has traveled after the earthquake) while superimposing it on his own body being ravaged by cancer. Part of it is animated, blurring the lines between the ordinary and extraordinary and beckoning the viewer into the video.

 

Yu Nishimura / Act, acrylic on canvas, 2017

Yu Nishimura / Factory, oil on canvas, 2018

Yu Nishimura

Rather than reproducing actual scenery, Nishimura depicts the present moment while layering in the things he takes notice of in daily life. His paintings resemble landscapes or people you have seen somewhere before, or scenes from a tale. In this exhibition, they are displayed in the space in a way that naturally suggests a story linking the works next to each other. He will exhibit new paintings inspired by early spring at this exhibition, with the aim of inspiring viewers to spin new stories.

 

Nao Yoshigai / Breathing House, film, 2017

Nao Yoshigai / Hottamaru Days, film, 2015

Nao Yoshigai

Yoshigai uses video and sound to depict physical sensations, striving to create a new form of video expression. Her film Breathing House (2017) was shot at the Seizasha in Kyoto, where the Okada Seiza method of mental and physical cultivation popular in the Taisho Period was promoted, right before the building was destroyed. She carefully depicted the sounds that come from physical movements, linked with the determined breathing method and posture in which the subject sits quietly while holding the stomach strong. In this way, she filmed a scene that one doesn’t usually notice. For this exhibition, she will showcase a video installation that seems to integrate with the viewer’s body.

 

First Lingering Mist of Spring
ACT (Artists Contemporary TOKAS) Vol. 1
February 23 – March 24, 2019 / TOKAS
In cooperation with Imura Art Gallery, KAYOKOYUKIVenue
Visit the exhibition page >